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Jerusalem Artichokes and other Carluccio ideas

Ivan

Undecided
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4,778
Location
Peeblesshire
#1
Good old Roberto Carluccio kicked the bucket this week at the estimable age of 80. In his honour, yesterday, I made antipasti dishes from my Carluccio book

Two dishes come to mind this morning

The first is Parma ham with mozzarella; it is as delicious as it is simple

You need a pack of Parma ham (6 or more slices), one BUFFALO mozzarella and some chopped sage, thyme and rosemary....fresh or dried

Slice the mozzarella into lengths, roll each length in herbs and then roll each piece into half a length of Parma ham. One mozzarella will do at least a dozen rolls. This is where buffallo really is best for flavour and texture

The other recipe is Jerusalem Artichokes cooked in butter and stock. I've had seismic reminders of this dish this morning

You need J artichoke 1lb, 1 onion chopped, 1 1/2 oz butter, 200ml water or stock, juice half lemon, parsley

Put lemon juice into the stock, peel and roughly chop the artichoke and put into the stock/lemon to prevent discoloration

Melt butter and sweat the chopped onion. Add the artichoke and liquid, simmer for 30 mins with pan lid off to let the liquids become syrupy. Season and serve warm with parsley sprinkled
 

Ivan

Undecided
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Messages
4,778
Location
Peeblesshire
#3
Another winner is Salmon Tartare

500 gm fresh salmon, skinned, chopped and chopped and chopped until it looks like mince

Mix in juice half lemon , 2tsp chopped brined green peppercorns, 2tsp olive oil, handful chopped dill, salt to taste and an egg yolk

Rate good on toast

And finally.... Quail Eggs in a Nest

Boil quail eggs (up to six per person) for 2 mins then cool in running water to keep yolks runny

Shell the eggs. I found this a bit of a pig but the answer seems to be to crack the shell thoroughly all over and then if you start peeling at the fat end where the air sac is you can get shell and membrane off without digging holes in the white

Arrange peppery salad leaves in a circle, make an inner ring of mayonnaise (homemade is gooood) and arrange boiled eggs in the centre

The eggs are an absolute delight with creamy runny yolks
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
7,448
Location
KIC 8462852
#11
Does this mean that in order to curry favour with the Mods, I have to comb dirt from their hair?
Basically yes as that is the origin of the phrase.

Curry favour comes from an Old French verb conraier - 'to prepare', 'to put in order'. This is the same source as the name for the rubbing down and dressing of horses - curry-combing.
The mishearing that gives us 'curry favour' is of the second word. This was originally not 'favour' but 'favel'. John Palsgrave's Lesclarcissement de la langue françoyse [The clarification of the French language], 1530, records a curryfavell as 'a flatterar'.

Favel comes from the 1310 poem by the French royal clerk Gervais du Bus - Roman de Fauvel [The Romance of Fauvel]. That morality tale relates the story of Fauvel, an ambitious and vain horse, who deceives and corrupts the greedy leaders of church and state. The name Fauvel or Favvel, which is formed from 'fau-vel' (in English 'veiled lie'), is an acrostic made from the initial letters of a version of the seven deadly sins: flaterie (flattery/pride), avarice (greed/gluttony), vilanie (wrath), variété (inconstancy), envie (envy), and lacheté (cowardice).
In the poem, the rich and powerful humiliate themselves by bowing down and stroking the coat of the false leader, that is, by 'currying Fauvel'.
The first citation of 'curry favour' rather than 'curry Fauvel' comes in Alexander Barclay's, The mirrour of good manners, circa 1510:
"Flatter not as do some, With none curry favour."
 

Alice

Psychedelic
Subscriber
Messages
4,291
Location
Kent, the Garden of England
#12
Basically yes as that is the origin of the phrase.
Curry favour comes from an Old French verb conraier - 'to prepare', 'to put in order'. This is the same source as the name for the rubbing down and dressing of horses - curry-combing.

The mishearing that gives us 'curry favour' is of the second word. This was originally not 'favour' but 'favel'. John Palsgrave's Lesclarcissement de la langue françoyse [The clarification of the French language], 1530, records a curryfavell as 'a flatterar'.

Favel comes from the 1310 poem by the French royal clerk Gervais du Bus - Roman de Fauvel [The Romance of Fauvel]. That morality tale relates the story of Fauvel, an ambitious and vain horse, who deceives and corrupts the greedy leaders of church and state. The name Fauvel or Favvel, which is formed from 'fau-vel' (in English 'veiled lie'), is an acrostic made from the initial letters of a version of the seven deadly sins: flaterie (flattery/pride), avarice (greed/gluttony), vilanie (wrath), variété (inconstancy), envie (envy), and lacheté (cowardice).

In the poem, the rich and powerful humiliate themselves by bowing down and stroking the coat of the false leader, that is, by 'currying Fauvel'.

The first citation of 'curry favour' rather than 'curry Fauvel' comes in Alexander Barclay's, The mirrour of good manners, circa 1510:

"Flatter not as do some, With none curry fauour."
Well I never........
Thank you Targa... I enjoyed reading that and the little illustration. At first I thought that was a scene from Midsummer Night’s Dream.
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
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Messages
7,448
Location
KIC 8462852
#15
:dontunderstand: How?
Also.... that’s as maybe.. but the thread is about Jerusalem artichokes, so shouldn’t we be making our way back there?
I took the reference to Midsummer Night’s Dream as you took the character on the left to be he who was turned into a donkey.
 

nigeld

festina andante
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Messages
2,882
Location
Bristol
#17
So now I am wondering whether I should butter up the Mods before or after I curry favour with them. Sounds messy either way.
 
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