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Saxophones Jericho J-6 Tenor Sax Review from a beginners perspective

TheCureFan

Member
Messages
207
Well my new Jericho J-6 arrived today, so as promised here’s a review. Please excuse incorrect terminology etc as I’m new to this and still learning.

Firstly I would like to publicly thank Robbie at Student Music Supplies for the excellent service provided. All in all a thoroughly nice chap, very easy to talk to. Haven't needed it yet for obvious reasons, but i should imagine aftercare service will be the same, exceptional

On to the review.

On opening the packaging you find the upgraded case, in brown with large Jericho Horns logo on the front. The case has a large external pocket big enough for several A4 sized books/sheet music and probably a few other accessories. There are D rings to fit the supplied shoulder strap and some backpack style straps. Internally the case is velvet covered (dark Brown), hard foam which should provide adequate protection for most beginners needs. There are compartments for the sax (obviously), neck, mouthpiece and accessories. Also supplied are a cleaning cloth, neck strap, spare reed, cork grease and some gloves. These are all, as expected, budget items but are perfectly serviceable.

The horn itself. I chose the, new to the range, matte gold which looks absolutely gorgeous. On inspection the finish looks even and smooth overall, including the neck and appears to be a matt lacquer rather than polished metal (Robbie may be able to verify). I did find one small blemish on the A key cup but this was only very minor and no way detracts from the overall finish or indeed playability. The horn itself appears sturdily made and there was no undue or unwanted movement on any of the key work , etc. All guards where solidly attached. The neck fit was very smooth and needed only minimal effort to insert, and once in was held securely in place by the screw. A few people have said the octave mechanism on the alto felt a little slack, don’t know if the other tenors are the same but this is not the case with this one. Robbie has said that some minor design alterations where made on advice, maybe this was one area. One other minor problem was a stiff low C key roller. Closer inspection found a burr on the roller which, once removed, cured the problem. Supplied with the sax is a basic shove it pad saver, a no name mouthpiece, probably generic 4c, and a matte gold, 2 screw basic ligature. All perfectly useable items for a beginner.

Ergonomics. The J-6 doesn’t feel unduly heavy, felt nicely balanced and sits very nicely in the hands and with thumbs in place fingers easily found the pearls, which are concave with no sharp edges. The left hand thumb sits on a plastic rest and the octave key is easily playable. The right hand thumb rest is plastic?, maybe plastic coated metal, and is adjustable via a screw. The left hand key table (G# etc) is nicely placed and I can easily reach the low Bb key (I have big hands, small fingers and struggle a bit with my alto). The low C/Eb keys are a little more towards the rear than I’m used to my alto but are easily reached. The palm keys fit nicely around the inside of the palm without getting in the way and are nice and smooth to the touch.

Playing. This is where I’ll struggle as I have nothing to compare this too as this is my first tenor and wouldn’t know an overly bright or dark sounding one if it came up and slapped me. Also I cant quite cover the entire range yet, my comfortable range is palm d to low C so this was the extent of the play test. Setup, as I have no other yet, was the supplied mouthpiece, lig and 2.5 reed. Tone is based on a few scales and some tunes from a new tune a day. To start The J-6 was extremely easy to blow and produced an acceptable (given the setup) nice clear even tone, from my limited knowledge I’d say on the brighter side, right across my range. Intonation was good, not perfect, getting slightly sharper as I went up but was easily corrected/ maintained especially for someone like me with limited ability. Whilst playing scales the keys felt, what I can only describe as, just right neither too strong nor too weak (perfect if your goldilocks or the baby bear). I think the tone could be improved with a small outlay on a decent mouthpiece and some better reeds. Overall though a very nice sound out of the box from what at the end of the day is a budget sax.

My overall thoughts are this is a very worthy instrument and is exceptional value for money. The quality is just about on a par with the John Packer mid range student alto I have that cost more than this. The equivalent Tenor is twice the price and Yamahas even more. If your on a budget and looking for a nice Tenor you wont go far wrong.


THE END
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Nice review. I play tested the alto version and though much the same.

Re the price, get 'em while you can. At £339 to £439 depending on finish, the price is only going to go one way. A bargain.
 

C_Claudemonster

Formerly saxgirl22
Messages
399
Good review, I had an alto on the pass around the other week and was really impressed with it. I'm hoping to treat myself to a rose gold lacquered one in the new year. They're extremely good value for money and very well thought out saxes. :)
 

Profusia

Senior Member
Messages
984
Ordered their curved soprano (silver nickel body and gold keywork) yesterday so I can practice on holiday! :)

If it seems the business I may go for a tenor in the new year although am undecided as everyone seems to feel they have a bright tone and not sure if that's what I want. To be honest I'm not sure I can actually even recognise bright from dark yet!
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Sounds like they could be the new Bauhaus Walstein - remember when they cost about £300 for a Phosphur Bronze sax. Good review, and it was clear enough as to what you were saying throughout. If the tone is a little bright for some folks I would suggest a Windcraft Etude or Bari Esprit mouthpiece as providing a calming influence.

Kind regards
Tom
 
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TheCureFan

Member
Messages
207
Good review, and it was clear enough as to what you were saying throughout.
Thanks for the kind words.

If the tone is a lttle bright for some folks I would suggest a Windcraft Etude or Bari Esprit mouthpiece as providing a calming influence.
That was my thoughts, overall not a bad sound given all I had to play was the stock generic mouthpiece/reed. I'm sure in the right hands with right setup it could be darkened a tad.
 

J.J.

New Member
Messages
9
Cool review! I look forward to getting a matt alto next week. It's been one of my concerns - the looks of the instrument. It goes without saying that the sound is the most important thing but if you're spending a few hundred quid, you at least expect to have something better than a shiny golden, gypsy artifact (Trevor James gold) or an aluminium foil-plated horn (Trevor James silver). This matt alto looks stunning as photographed. If it looks half as good live...
 

TheCureFan

Member
Messages
207
Have to admit I'm not a fan of shiny gold, pretty much full stop, regardless of what its on. The matt does look as good in person as it does in the photos, at least I think so. Hope you like yours when it arrives.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,078
There's nothing like that brand new sax feeling but it's just plkain cheating buying a matt saxophone. I have an old lafleur alto, bought new in the mid 1980's. 30 odd years of abuse and it's pretty matt now. They all go matt eventualy. Some nice shades of green on it too. Buy a shiney one and put in the hours.
 

TheCureFan

Member
Messages
207
I'm not trying to cheat the aging process. I just don't like shiny gold. I play guitar as well and don't like guitars with gold hardware. Even my wedding rings not gold, its tungsten.
 

Philly123

Member
Messages
185
I'm going to order one of these for hubby for Christmas. I recently bought him a trumpet because he wanted to learn it. He's had a couple of lessons which he's enjoyed but keeps eyeing my sax. He impulsively ordered himself a Yamaha Tenor from an online store but it got lost in transit so he cancelled the order.

The reviews on these are very good, sound more than adequate for a beginner and much cheaper than a Yamaha. I'm also hoping it might come my way if he decides he prefers the trumpet! I fancy the matt gold version>:)
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,078
I'm not trying to cheat the aging process. I just don't like shiny gold. I play guitar as well and don't like guitars with gold hardware. Even my wedding rings not gold, its tungsten.
Strangely I don't like gold either but I don't even consider brass in the same category. Your comment about the wedding ring got me thinking(too much time on my hands at the moment) about the custom of using gold. While looking it up I came across this which made me chuckle


This talking about wedding ring material;
"In early Rome it was iron that was adopted as the metal of choice rather than
copper or brass as mostly elsewhere. This symbolized the strength of love a man
felt for his chosen woman, though rust was a problem."


Ain't it the truth
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
It seems to be unfashionable, but I like 'em shiny, and intend to keep mine that way for as long as I can. Given that theyre all cheapos, they'll probably fall apart before they have the chance to go matt.
 

J.J.

New Member
Messages
9
It seems to be unfashionable, but I like 'em shiny, and intend to keep mine that way for as long as I can. Given that theyre all cheapos, they'll probably fall apart before they have the chance to go matt.
Speaking of longevity, how long would it last, then? 5 yrs? 10yrs?
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Any sax, properly set up, looked after and serviced should last a lifetime.

It will, at some stage need pads, springs, corks replacing as they wear/drop off/break. But with normal use this shouldn't set you back too much, especially in the first 5-10 years. A lot depends on pad quality and usage.

Question is, will it, at some point in the future need repairs that are more than the instrument is worth.... And that's impossible to predict.
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
Any sax, properly set up, looked after and serviced should last a lifetime.

It will, at some stage need pads, springs, corks replacing as they wear/drop off/break. But with normal use this shouldn't set you back too much, especially in the first 5-10 years. A lot depends on pad quality and usage.

Question is, will it, at some point in the future need repairs that are more than the instrument is worth.... And that's impossible to predict.
It's wear on the keywork that worries me (slightly) for the long term. But no problems of that kind yet. Had the alto and tenor for a couple of years now. Somehow I doubt if I'll still be playing them 30 years from now when all the lacquer's gone. I'll be 84 by then anyway, and lucky if I can still pick up a saxophone (though I have every intention of doing so).
 
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