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SYOS

Is there a simple home remedy for a loose mouthpiece?

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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Messages
3,757
I have several alto mouthpieces and they all fit well on the neck, save one. I do not leave the mouthpieces on the neck when I'm done, so I'm not compressing the cork with a tight mpc. Just one of my mouthpieces is too loose, so the solution isn't on the cork, but on the wayward mpc. I don't think it leaks air, but it's so loose, I may be moving it when I play. Some little hack, if there is one, would be appreciated. All my mouthpieces are plastic.

Is there a simple way to mitigate this? Right now, I simply don't use it much, which makes it a poor return on investment.
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,747
Depends how loose it is.
If it's very loose you could try making a shrinkfit adaptor.
Measure the diameter of the cork at its largest point (usually the rear end of the cork). Buy a piece of thinwall shrinkfit tubing that's around 5mm larger in diameter. Cut a piece to the length of the cork.
Grease the cork well, slip the tubing over the cork then gently heat it with a hair dryer.
Don't go mad - you're not looking to shrink the tube hard onto the cork...just enough to snug it down. Let it cool, then simply slide it off.

Whenever you want to use the larger mouthpiece, pop the sleeve onto the cork then push the mouthpiece on.
I've suggested thinwall tubing because ordinary shrinkfit might work out to be too thick - but given the low cost of the stuff it wouldn't hurt to get a few thicknesses in.
 

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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5,362
A solution that I have used is to get a wine pourer disk (a circular piece of stiff foil) and cut it to size to fit inside the mouthpiece shank. A dab of contact glue will hold it in place but try it without glue first to see if it works. Amazon have lots of them.

A more high-tech solution is a copper head joint fitting strip fixed inside the mouthpiece.:
 

Nordbo

Member
Messages
30
The curse of not having a standard mouthpiece shank ID . . . .
I, too, like to shift between mouthpieces. In order to do this, I modify mouthpieces (not metal ones) when necessary.
If the shank diameter is too small, I rebore with a dowel and sanpaper - i little a time.
If the shank diameter is too big I coat the bore with epoxy (clean the bore first). Then I use the dowel and sanpaper.
I was nervous when did this the first time, but all went well. Just be careful not to make the bore out of round or tapered.
\Bo
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
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Messages
3,757
Thanks, all!
I tried the plumbers pipe gasket tape and it worked well. In fact, the tape stayed where it was when I removed the mpc. I'd hate to try to do anything truly physical to it because I'm very unhandy. I tried to glue pads with a blowtorch, and while this didn't end in tears, the sax is still not fixed! So, glue etc may not be for me. All my mpc fit ok except one. The temp fixes will be fine for the moment and if I fall in love, I'll get someone better equipped to do a permanent fix.
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,582
I have several alto mouthpieces and they all fit well on the neck, save one. I do not leave the mouthpieces on the neck when I'm done, so I'm not compressing the cork with a tight mpc. Just one of my mouthpieces is too loose, so the solution isn't on the cork, but on the wayward mpc. I don't think it leaks air, but it's so loose, I may be moving it when I play. Some little hack, if there is one, would be appreciated. All my mouthpieces are plastic.

Is there a simple way to mitigate this? Right now, I simply don't use it much, which makes it a poor return on investment.
A mpc that is so loose can you play it? When I bought a new baritone mpc the new one was too loose on the neck. I pushed the mpc while I was playing. So much that I went out of pitch. The mouthpice is a part of your saxophone. They are designed to work with the type of mouthpices that were available when the sax was designed.

Here is two Martin necks. Same inner diameter but the Comm III is c 10 mm loner than the Comm II neck. A result of that the music and mouthpieces changed over the years. A longer an modern mpc can fit an older and shorter neck. But sometimes techs and players prefer to solder on a neck extender/enhancer.

I guess I'm off topic!?!?!
comm necks.JPG
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
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7,586
I have had good success with the Valentino synthetic neck corks from JL Smith. I have installed these for several customers who have different size mouthpiece shanks. They compress quite a bit for those with smaller shanks, but when the mouthpiece is removed the material expands back to its original state. The video below shows how they are installed. That said, I second the idea of using plumbers teflon tape as the most practical solution in this case.

 

GJ77

Senior Member
Messages
678
Yep, PTFE tape is the way for me. I always keep some in my gig back at the back of the stage when playing in case of emergencies.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,648
I don't understand why players need to change mouthpieces. I faffed about with different mouthpieces at one stage.

With practice the right mouthpiece will be versatile enough for any situation. Pick one and stick at it. ;)
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
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7,586
I don't understand why players need to change mouthpieces. I faffed about with different mouthpieces at one stage.

With practice the right mouthpiece will be versatile enough for any situation. Pick one and stick at it. ;)
Sometimes when players perform in different styles such as classical and jazz, each one requires a different set-up. Usually the mouthpieces have the same size opening, but not always. I have heard of some who use the same mouthpiece for both, but I have never achieved the level of control to pull that off. ;)
 

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
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3,633
With practice the right mouthpiece will be versatile enough for any situation. Pick one and stick at it. ;)
Wisdom comes as a result of practice... I've been practicing GAS for a while so will wisdom come as a reward?

Maybe, but in the meantime I'm waiting for my next mouthpiece to arrive. :eek:
 

Ivan

Undecided
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7,123
Wisdom comes as a result of practice... I've been practicing GAS for a while so will wisdom come as a reward?

Maybe, but in the meantime I'm waiting for my next mouthpiece to arrive. :eek:
I'm sure there's a saying about running fast and getting nowhere
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
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8,755
I'm sure there's a saying about running fast and getting nowhere
Lewis Carroll - Through the Looking Glass.
"Well, in our country," said Alice, still panting a little, "you'd generally get to somewhere else—if you run very fast for a long time, as we've been doing."

"A slow sort of country!" said the Queen. "Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!"
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,747
Sometimes when players perform in different styles such as classical and jazz, each one requires a different set-up. Usually the mouthpieces have the same size opening, but not always. I have heard of some who use the same mouthpiece for both, but I have never achieved the level of control to pull that off. ;)
Case in point:

I use a Bari Cyclone and a Vandoren T25 on tenor.
The Cyclone is for the rock gigs - where I have to compete with a bunch of amplified instruments. The Vandoren is used for everything else.
Now, I could make either piece work in either situation - but it would tough going to tone down the 'exuberance' of the Cyclone in, say, a jazz quintet setting...or push the Vandoren hard enough to get the grit and volume required when 'Born To Run' gets called. It's just making extra work for myself.

I could, of course, find a piece that better hit the middle ground - but then you end up with a jack of all trades, master of none scenario...and that's just not much fun.

The two-piece setup is pretty common (judging from what I see in client's horn cases) - but if I see three or more pieces it usually means a struggling player.
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 2.25 years
Subscriber
Messages
3,757
This type, which isn't as good for plumbing needs as the white gasket kind, is excellent for an overly large mouthpiece. Works great and doesn't stick or leave a film.

IMG_20200117_122916.jpg
 

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
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3,633
Well, I've been down that path already as you can expect with as many mouthpieces as I have...

I showed the trick to my friend a few weeks ago when we had our mouthpieces tasting party and he was delighted. He finally managed to use his Otto Link and tune it to work as he played along with his son on clarinet.

I still have a SYOS I need to work on as it is way to wide. I returned it, but they won't admit it... Even the 'Name' in the mouthpiece uses fillers (looks like paper) on the pictures of him playing that signature piece!
 

saxyjt

I have saxophone withdrawal symptoms
Subscriber
Messages
3,633
I use a Bari Cyclone and a Vandoren T25 on tenor.
I had never heard of the Cyclone. It looks like a rocket! Ain't cheap either.

I really liked the T25. Perhaps I should come back to it from time to time...

The two-piece setup is pretty common (judging from what I see in client's horn cases) - but if I see three or more pieces it usually means a struggling player.
Hmmm! I must be struggling then. Oh, well of course, I am struggling. I've always been. I'm way too curious not to be. :confused2: Can't help it.
 
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