Mouthpieces Is there a natural development in what you want from a mouthpiece?

Marvan

Senior Member
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On the banks of the Tay, UK
Hi
I just wondered, as you mature as a saxophonist, whether there was a natural development of what peoples needs and wants out of their mouthpiece were?
A bit like drinking wine?
I understand there are lots of other factors
Any thoughts?
Cheers
Marvan
 
I think as you get better and are more able to control the sax ,then as your facial muscles develop then a wider range of mouthpieces come into play,but for me its all about getting as close to the sound you have in your head.
There are many factors to consider,i.e. do you go for metal,hard rubber,no baffle,rollover baffle,high baffle,big tip opening,close tip opening,the only way to find out is to try different different setups and find what you play best.
But yes the more competent a player you are,the more options open up to you.
 
I think as you get better and are more able to control the sax ,then as your facial muscles develop then a wider range of mouthpieces come into play,but for me its all about getting as close to the sound you have in your head.
There are many factors to consider,i.e. do you go for metal,hard rubber,no baffle,rollover baffle,high baffle,big tip opening,close tip opening,the only way to find out is to try different different setups and find what you play best.
But yes the more competent a player you are,the more options open up to you.

I tend to agree, not only with MP,s but with reeds also. I think it's a good ex. To practice with a reed that's not perfect. Play it for a bit, have a break, then continue. The reed does seem to get better.
 
I think as you get better and are more able to control the sax ,then as your facial muscles develop then a wider range of mouthpieces come into play,but for me its all about getting as close to the sound you have in your head.
There are many factors to consider,i.e. do you go for metal,hard rubber,no baffle,rollover baffle,high baffle,big tip opening,close tip opening,the only way to find out is to try different different setups and find what you play best.
But yes the more competent a player you are,the more options open up to you.

PS. Doubling is essentially the same. Different MP, so if you have a decent embouchure on one the easier it is play the others. And when I hear talk about the Clarinet to Sax is a huge change, it renforces my belief.
 
Yes, when you first start the most important factor is how easy it is to play, and a part of this is being reed friendly. Then as you get more experience and control you look for something that will give you more control, and also has a core sound closer to where you want to be.

Sadly GAS creeps in and you start buying on other people's choices - or because you simply want something different/flashier...
 
Hi Kev
I think you have it sussed
What is GAS?
Cheers
Marvan
 
When starting out most players seem to do better with a middle of the road mouthpiece. One with a medium close tip opening, a medium facing, and medium tip and side rails. A well made student mouthpiece fits these criteria such as the Yamaha 4C and the Fobes Debut. Such mouthpieces are more forgiving while tone production skills and embouchure muscle tone are being developed.

Once the developing player is consistently getting the biggest, most beautiful tone possible on this set-up then it is time to look at upgrading to a more professional set-up which demands better breath and embouchure control. A major consideration is what style of music going to be played and what category of sound within that style the player is looking to achieve. It is always a good idea to work with an experienced teacher who can serve as a guide to help navigate through the maze of options.
 
I tend to agree, not only with MP,s but with reeds also. I think it's a good ex. To practice with a reed that's not perfect. Play it for a bit, have a break, then continue. The reed does seem to get better.
I always practise with reeds that are not perfect as in i always keep the best reeds for gigs.
 
From frequenting this forum I'd say the mouthpiece you want is the one you haven't got

If you haven't got the mouthpiece you haven't got because it's too expensive then it really is the one you want
 
Thank you for all the wise words
You have put in writing what I have been slowly realising
I have enjoyed my adventures, but have almost returned to the beginning again, to something I find easy to play!
It is all about enjoying it !
 
In one way, mouthpieces and saxes are similar to golf clubs and putters - the next one you buy will be the best ever.
 
I didn't buy mine and she cost me even more money!
Edit. But worth every penny
 
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