SYOS

Is there a name for this?

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,912
Hi everyone,
What it is is this, lets say i just played an A and my next note is going to be a C, i play the A followed by a B, followed by another A, then a G#.... so i am crushing the A, B, A, G# all into one beat then going up to the C.

The pattern seems to be "the note" up two semitones, back to "the note" and down a semitone, seems to work with all other notes as well, is there a recognised name for this? and what other combinations can be used?


Heard quite a few sax players use this patern, perticuarly tenor players, i even use it myself but find if i overdo it it tends to water the whole solo down somewhat.
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
857
Hi everyone,
What it is is this, lets say i just played an A and my next note is going to be a C, i play the A followed by a B, followed by another A, then a G#.... so i am crushing the A, B, A, G# all into one beat then going up to the C.

The pattern seems to be "the note" up two semitones, back to "the note" and down a semitone, seems to work with all other notes as well, is there a recognised name for this? and what other combinations can be used?


Heard quite a few sax players use this patern, perticuarly tenor players, i even use it myself but find if i overdo it it tends to water the whole solo down somewhat.

Does it have to have a name? Seems it's just a pattern of practice.

I know, let's call it 'Pattern Practice'! :)>:) (All rights reserved on this new saxophone feature) :thankyou:

That didn't help, did it?​

Cheers

Martin
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,912
"Classically", it's a turn.
OK Thanks, just done some more digging around and i think it may, but i'm not 100% sure be whats called (not sure about the spelling either, but sounds like) acci-acatura, has anybody else heard of this? and if it's not what i think it is what is a acci-acatura?
 

stefank

Member
Messages
366
OK Thanks, just done some more digging around and i think it may, but i'm not 100% sure be whats called (not sure about the spelling either, but sounds like) acci-acatura, has anybody else heard of this? and if it's not what i think it is what is a acci-acatura?

That is literally a "crushed" note (sometimes more than one) just before the main note, not to to be confused with an appogiatura which has more length, a definite proportion (which can vary!) of the main note. The are lumped under the general heading of "grace notes".
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Good explanations Stefan.

Martin, you may want to look up cran and mordant as well
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Yes indeed,it is correctly, a turn. Usually one note above then down to one note below the principal note, in key. However, if either are to be # or b that is indicated in written music by the appropriate symbol above or below the turn sign (a short wavy line).

An acciaccatura (pronounced, so my teacher drummed into me, "akachatura", not good Italian, but there we are) is a single grace note played immediately before the principal note (or on a multi toned instrument, simultaneously, but released quickly) and, in a literal translation, bruised or crushed, against it.
YC
 
Top Bottom