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Introducing DSax...

DSax

New Member
Messages
4
Hi All,
DSax here, pleased to register on the site, it really stands out as an excellent resource and community also Pete seems like a jolly nice bloke!

A little history about myself:

I've played soprano, alto and tenor; I favour the tenor these days, it just fits me best for size and sound.

I'm not a professional, never been to music college, largely self-taught and the periods of time when I've put in a decent amount of practice or have been actively playing have been sporadic over the last (blimey) 25 years.

Got my first sax when I was around 14/15 years old and since that time always wanted to learn Jazz but never could find the right teacher or book. I remember buying the Charlie Parker Omnibook which I tried to work through but didn't have a clue apart from on an intuitive level what he was doing. Played the material with Jazz groups in my teens, looking back I wonder how I got through the solos I was truly "using the force". That was around the time when Courtney Pine was just starting and a little later Andy Shepherd. I went to see the two and it was like a religious experience, totally blown away by the sound, skill and creativity. Actually the first ever Sax concert I went to was Grover Washington at the Albert Hall for my sixteenth birthday, I've loved Jazz Funk and Fusion ever since.

So my experience is small Jazz groups in teenage years, small amount of big band a bit later on, a few years in a pop band, about 5 years of 60's soul function band (weddings, parties etc). Highlights were playing at the Palladium (for a charity variety concert) and having a large crowd of drunk people jumping around to my soul solos at the Woking Beer Festival!

Really trying to learn Jazz now and realising how far off I am and wondering if I can meet it half way in Jazz Funk, I like a good groove. I would say my Jazz ability is nascent.

My ears are poor although improving very slowly, I have ideas that appear in my head but apart from short licks have to sit and work through them for a minute or so, some way off of the split second reactions of an improvised performance.

I have found Mark Levine's Jazz Theory book a God send and a jumping off point into other books and resources.

Who do I listen to?

I try to make my listening as broad as possible, YouTube is great for finding tracks, looking at my recent playlist I've got all sorts:
  • Joshua Redman
  • David Sanborn
  • Miles Davis
  • Cannonball Adderley
  • Lizz Wright
  • Hank Mobley
  • Paolo Fresu & Uri Caine
  • Coltrane
  • Ernie Watts
  • Brecker
  • Crusaders
  • Bob Sands

I'm quite happy to listen to any music if it's good! Classical, pop, I was listening to film soundtracks for several hours the other day.

I'm not in a group at the moment, it's awkward as I'm hopping between the UK and Spain where, I've been spending quite a bit of time with my Spanish girlfriend.

Anyway that gives you some idea, I look forward to exchangning ideas.

Cheers,
DSax
 
Last edited by a moderator:

llamedos

Senior Member
Messages
431
A very warm welcome to this hallowed haven - by the sound of things you will fit in well! Remember two things - don't take life too seriously and, above all, continue to enjoy your music.

Dave
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
Welcome to the forum.

On the listening front, players like Coltrane, Adderley etc (even Parker) started making a lot more sense to my ears after listening to some of their predecessors. Notably Coleman Hawkins and Lester young.
 

DSax

New Member
Messages
4
Welcome to the forum.

On the listening front, players like Coltrane, Adderley etc (even Parker) started making a lot more sense to my ears after listening to some of their predecessors. Notably Coleman Hawkins and Lester young.
In what way would did they make more sense to you?

Are you perhaps thinking of the vertical / horizontal approach to playing and the transition from chord tones to melody? In trying to get the jazz language into my head and move between the chord tones in a melodic way it certainly helps to listen to Hawkins and Young first, but it's taken me years to realise it's the scratchy old recordings I should put as priority rather than the blisteringly fast and fascinating music of someone like Chris Potter. Although you won't stop me listening to that stuff with my jaw on the floor.

Thanks for all the welcome comments.
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
In what way would did they make more sense to you?
In the sense that they sounded more like music and less like random notes played fast just to show off. That is, I was becoming more familiar (at a mostly unconscious level) with the harmonic and rhythmic langauage of jazz.

Are you perhaps thinking of the vertical / horizontal approach to playing and the transition from chord tones to melody?
Nothing as specific or theoretical as that. Just training my ears to better appreciate that kind of music. I had to do the same with Mahler, Wagner, Bartok etc at an earler age. Some people, it seems, either like something at first hearing or they never will. I've always found it takes me a while to "get" something different.
 

BUMNOTE

Senior Member
Messages
573
Hi welcome from me too,that was a good intro about yourself,seems like you have a bit of history there....yes real nice people on here,who always willing to help and encourage you.Bumnote.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
Welcome to the caff©, Dsax.

You mention Palladium. Always thought that was a semi-precious metal.

ENJOY!​™
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
I hope that DSax has a good time on DForum!

Kind regards from The Skabertawe Lights down by yer in South Wales, mind!

Reminds me of that ancient joke: When asked about defence, President Amin replied: "de man with de nails will be along in de morning.........." :shocked::w00t:;}
 
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