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I'm a Highschooler from the West. Like very West.

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69
Hey everyone, I'm a high school grad from Roseburg, Oregon, and I will be attending Berklee College of Music in late January. I was wondering if, between now and then, should I offer private lessons to beginners? I know I'm not a professional, but should I do it to get them started better than you can get started in the public school system? I think it could be benificial to them, but I don't know how much to charge.
Any advice from anyone is greatly appreciated.
Thank you all =],
Aubrianna
 

Rogerb

Member
Messages
764
Hi Aubrianna
There is, IMO, nothing like teaching for making you realise how little you know about most things..... I thought I was competent at computer programming, until I started teaching it! You get good at saying"I am not sure, but I will find out and get back to you!" :)
But it should benefit both you and your 'pupils' ....so I'd not charge too much at this stage....but I don't know what a 'reasonable fee' would be, sorry!
Good luck
 

Gandalfe

Member
Messages
107
I give two lessons a year as part of a charity drive auction. So the winning bidder is usually a late bloomer (adult) coming back to music performance. I inspect the instrument, provide all the tips I wish I'd had when I returned to music, and then recommend one of my fav teachers based on the student's fav music genre.

I usually find leaking pads, terrible mouthpieces, and bent stuff. If I can't fix it I have a battery of techs ranging from expensive/pro to inexpensive/college teacher who can fix anything. I have been known to let one of my 50 some mouthpieces go to a good home too. :)

Sometimes I recommend one of the bands I play with if the student is ready for it. Other times I let them sit in with a band so that they can start networking. As the others have mentioned I usually learn as much as my students. And my fav charity gets $60 to $80 to boot.
 
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TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi There!

Welcome to the Cafe Saxophone. My understanding of the word "professional" is that it is someone who gets paid for what they do, irrespective of whether they have a narrowly specified qualification. It means, for example that my daughter receives payment for baby - sitting, though does not have a formal qualificatio in child care or nursery education. In the same way lots of people with variously acquired skills charge fees for services offered. Most music teachers that I know do not have a formal qualification in teaching how to play a musical instrument, though the majority of them have achieved a certain standard in the instruments that they play, which is often certificated.

Given this I think it would be fine to advertise your services and provide some idea of any training, experience and any certification that you might possess. I will always be prepared to receive paid lessons from someone that I respect, like, get on with, and can learn from - whether that is because of their experience, training or qualification, or any combination.

Hope this helps.
Kind regards
Tom
 
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O.C.V.

Member
Messages
113
Hi, Aubrianna,
How lucky you are to be living in Oregon. I have memories of happy times there visiting my daughter who lives in Corvallis.
Definitely go for the teaching, it can be so rewarding. Many years ago I was teaching science in a high school and mentioned to the principal that I had played cornet when a teenager. He persuaded me to start teaching some of the children, gave me a budget to buy some instruments etc. I hadn't played for so long that I went to the local brass band to ask if I could sit in and that was the start of 40 happy years in music of all sorts. Moved onto sax when I retired and loving it. I have gained so much good advice from this site, there is always someone ready and able to help with any problems you may have.
Best wishes
O.C.V.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
You did also mention what fee you should charge. It would be a good idea to know what others charge in your neighbourhood and offer an appropriate range. In my neck of the woods £30 per hour is the common fee for someone who has, say, done a music degree and also plays professionally. Where people have either less training (in UK we have a 1 - 8 grading system where Grade 8 qualifies you to go on to university/college to study further) or are perhaps professional musicians without specific qualifications, the fees will be nearer £20 per hour. This does include students doing a music degree who would like to broaden their experience and earn some money.

So 2/3 of a full fee is common here in UK
Kind regards
Tom
 
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