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Saxophones Ida Maria Grassi Model 2000

Squawky

Member
Messages
38
Hey, Everybody!

I stopped in at my local horn shop yesterday to check out a sax that a friend of mine was looking to buy: a late 80s (according to serial number chart I found online) Ida Maria Grassi Model 2000 alto sax. I cracked open the case and examined it, and it seems like a really nice horn! The keys are fast with no play in the barrels, the lacquer is in good condition (except for one spot, which I'll explain) and it seems pretty solid (heavy, too!). I haven't heard a lot about this particular model, and I can't find any information that really details its worth. I've heard that the Professional 2000 is a good horn, but nothing about the Model 2000.

As for that lacquer spot, there is a bit of oxidation on the bell at the bottom of the engraving, and it doesn't seem too bad.

Basically, is this a professional horn? Why or why not? What makes it different than the Professional 2000? Should I recommend my friend to buy this horn? (It's selling for $900 USD). He's playing a student Jupiter Capital Edition Alto CES 760 right now.

Pictures attached, one of which includes the oxidation on the bell.

IMG_8081.jpg IMG_8079.jpg IMG_8072.jpg IMG_8071.jpg IMG_8073safe.jpg

Many Thanks!!

Squawky
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Have a look at this, from elsewhere on this site.

http://cafesaxophone.com/content.php?253-Grassi-Saxophones-how-to-recognise-them

$900 (or £600) seems to me to be quite a lot for a pretty standard Taiwanese sax, particularly since it has poor lacquer. I don't know anything about the sax market in the US, but based on my experiences from here, I'd think you could get something similar for less, or better for the same money.

I've never really understood the distinction between 'student' and 'professional' saxes. Saxes are either good or not so good, withincreasing cost you run into the law of diminishing marginal returns, some inexpensive saxes are great and some very expensive ones are complete lemons. The student/professional split strikes me as little more than a marketing ploy.
 

Squawky

Member
Messages
38
Have a look at this, from elsewhere on this site.

http://cafesaxophone.com/content.php?253-Grassi-Saxophones-how-to-recognise-them

$900 (or £600) seems to me to be quite a lot for a pretty standard Taiwanese sax
I did read the link you suggested, but it doesn't give any great detail about the Model 2000, just the models before and after it.
Also, I think that this horn is not Taiwanese, but made in Italy. The bell engraving in one of the pictures says Made in Italy, which according to the link, means that it was indeed made in Italy, and that the Taiwanese horns only say Italy on them.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
If it says Made in Italy it should indeed have been made there - I had understood that they abandoned European production by the time of the 2000, but seemingly not.

Incidentally, I haven't got anything against taiwanese saxes, their standard of manufacture is pretty high, it's just that there's an awful lot to choose from and a buyer can be choosy based on price.
 

Squawky

Member
Messages
38
Come to think of it, aren't Jupiters made in Taiwan?

But anyways, manufacturing location aside, would you recommend this 2000 despite the bit of oxidation at the bell?
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Get him to try both. You do the same. I'd guess there won't be a lot to say spend another $900 on the Grassi, unless there's something wrong with the Jupiter. However it's nice to have something a little different to everyone else.
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,807
The Grassi professional 2000 alto costed new $1045,00 at WWBW South Bend, IN (1999 catalouge). The other model, Prestige Series (goldplated) costed $1495,00. I would say that grassi saxes are an "upper" intermediate sax. Nice saxes. But I think $ 900,00 is quite a lot for a Grassi. I reacently bought a nice tenor here in Sweden, from the 80's, for a friend for c $ 500,00. Also a nice sax. At the same side in the catalouge Borgani Jubilee alto series were announced for $ 1695,00 for GP or Pearl Silver.

Thomas
 

MMM

Senior Member
Messages
917
Hey, Everybody!

I stopped in at my local horn shop yesterday to check out a sax that a friend of mine was looking to buy: a late 80s (according to serial number chart I found online) Ida Maria Grassi Model 2000 alto sax. I cracked open the case and examined it, and it seems like a really nice horn! The keys are fast with no play in the barrels, the lacquer is in good condition (except for one spot, which I'll explain) and it seems pretty solid (heavy, too!). I haven't heard a lot about this particular model, and I can't find any information that really details its worth. I've heard that the Professional 2000 is a good horn, but nothing about the Model 2000.

As for that lacquer spot, there is a bit of oxidation on the bell at the bottom of the engraving, and it doesn't seem too bad.

Basically, is this a professional horn? Why or why not? What makes it different than the Professional 2000? Should I recommend my friend to buy this horn? (It's selling for $900 USD). He's playing a student Jupiter Capital Edition Alto CES 760 right now.

Pictures attached, one of which includes the oxidation on the bell.

View attachment 1450 View attachment 1451 View attachment 1452

Many Thanks!!

Squawky
Hi Squawky,

the Model 2000 is an Italian made sax, NOT from Taiwan.
The Model 2000 was a transitional model produced just before (and possibly concurrently to) the Professional 2000.
After writing the Grassi article I found out the following: the Model 2000 altos and tenors were virtually the same as the Professional 2000 (this was NOT true of the sops and baris).
The main difference between the 2000s vs any previous unnamed Grassi, are the ergonomics (particularly the G#/B/Bb/C# cluster).
They are indeed very heavy and built to last! The price to me is reasonable if it doesn't require any intervention, if the shop can give you some assurance the sax has been serviced recently, then the price is about right (IMO) for the US. If not then try to get the price lowered, to factor in some pad replacements/servicing.

Let us know if you bought it and what you think of it!
Cheers,
M.
 
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