I was new yesterday

ajs1945

New Member
Messages
11
;} Hi every one posted yesterday on Beginners i am 65 years young and dont read music
Just taken up the Alto Sax trying to find a good teacher local i can get the sound out ok now but
it's not easy to put it all together fingers and reading the music :shocked::shocked: .

Allan
 

Chris98

Senior Member
Messages
1,076
Welcome Allan, I hope you enjoy your time here, this forum has been a great help to me on my journey with the sax and I'm sure you will find the same.

Some people respond well to a teacher others less so. I have found my teacher invaluable, not only in teaching me how to play but also with encouragement and making it fun, so I'd certainly say you are on the right lines to be looking for one.

As for reading music, if you want to, you will pick it up. My sight-reading skills are still very basic but before picking up the sax the dots on the page were completely incomprehensible to me! It does open the doors to a lot of music but is not the only way, and I’m sure a lot of us survive on some sight-reading skills and an improving ear to get us by.

Have fun,

Chris
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,428
Location
Coulsdon, London/Surrey
Welcome Alan. There are several of us more senior people on here, but we keep saying that age is unimportant. Hope you find a good teacher. Enjoy learning and hope you find it worthwhile calling in to cafe saxophone now and then.
YC
 
Welcome Allan. Plenty of old learners here. They are generally very helpful and encouraging, because everyone remembers picking the horn up for the first time and the noises were often not good. Given a few months, you'll be surprised at the progress you'll have made. Wander around the site for there is a lot of good information to help you in your quest. Enjoy yourself.
 

saxii

New Member
Messages
7
Location
Derbyshire, UK
;} Hi every one posted yesterday on Beginners i am 65 years young and dont read music
Just taken up the Alto Sax trying to find a good teacher local i can get the sound out ok now but
it's not easy to put it all together fingers and reading the music :shocked::shocked: .

Allan
Hi Allan,
welcome ! Good to have you join the forum and great that you've taken up the sax! I teach (Derbyshire, UK) but a good place to start may be www.musicteachers.co.uk

All the best,

Keri.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,232
Location
Skabertawe, South Wales
A warm welcome to the Cafe, Allan! Alto sax is a lovely instrument to learn, and does not require excessive amounts of puff. Have a look on www.musicteachers.co.uk to have some idea of teachers in your area - wherever that is. I had a great teacher who was less than half my age - great fun, learnt loads. Once you are underway it is great fun.

Do mention any questions that you have - there are often very many, even ones you have never thought of before. There are lots of good books out there which help you learn to read music.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
Subscriber
Messages
3,357
Location
manchester
Hi Allan

Welcome to the caff from sunny Manchester.I'm 61 now and 2.5 yrs in and loving every minute and that's the most important bit enjoy your sax.

you will be amazed how quickly your fingers start doing what you want them to.The best advice I can give you at this point is that slow is good in every thing you do with the sax.

Enjoy the journey...john
 

Riversider

Member
Messages
58
Location
Stirling, Scotland.
Hi Allan,

I’m much the same age as you, starting my second year of learning to play the alto while also trying to read music —all with absolutely zero previous knowledge or experience of music, apart for being a lifelong modern jazz fan.

This was my retirement project, and I’m here to say that it can be done, and how enjoyable it is.

There’s no doubt that the best way to learn reading music / playing is with the instrument in your hand, looking at the score. There’s a wealth of good stuff out there, especially on this website, and I’m sure you’ll find your own route, but if my experience can help, this is how I started.

I started with Pete Thomas’s DVD The Saxophone, Raphael Ravenscroft’s Complete Saxophone Player Book 1 and John O’Neill’s Jazz Method for Saxophone Vol 1, and found these helpful, though there was a sudden step-up half way through the O’Neill book that stumped me for a while. These titles are often recommended, but I also found Alastair Ingram’s website immensely helpful in the early stages of reading and playing, as he has pages of simple exercises to download, plus audio files to let you hear how it should sound. He’s a saxophone tutor in California. Once you’re looking for good sounding riffs and little tunes and progressive jazzy exercises I’d very strongly recommend Kellie Santin and Cheryl Clark’s book Creative Saxophone. This is the first book of four they do, published by OUP, and I think it’s great, really well judged for beginners, and I’m still working with and loving volume 1. I don’t often see this book mentioned on the web, but it’s really worth checking out.

I worked on my own to learn to read music (more or less) and how to play scales on the alto —all basic stuff—before seeking out a tutor, on the grounds that they shouldn’t have too high a mountain to climb! But the forum guys are right –it’s really good to work with a teacher.

All the best—enjoy.

PS: If you’re an AJS, I’m a Moto Guzzi.
 
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