M/Pieces - Ligs I found a random mouthpeice I kind of like

Ne0Wolf7

Member
Messages
466
Location
Long Island
Hello all,

Whilst rummaging a couple of days ago, I stumbled upon an old mouthpiece I've never been able to identify that I got with my grandfather's broken saxophone, I hadn't tried it before, so I decided that now was as good a time as any.
After using it for maybe twenty minutes, I decided I kind of like it. It's easy to use with many different reeds and strengths and sounds alright too There are absolutely no brandings or markings, but here's a description of the interesting bits:

It's made from hard rubber
It has a tip opening very similar in size to my Optimum AL3
There doesn't seem to be any roll-over or step to the baffle
The baffle is rounded
The side rails are scooped
The rails and tip are not very thin or very thick
The corners between the sides and baffle are rounded
It has a large, round chamber

Using my intuition, I would have thought these characteristics were going to make a dark warm sound (as a matter of fact I was expecting a classical mouthpiece), but I got more of a bright sound with a touch of buzz. I liked it enough to make a recording of myself playing a bit from Skylark with two different cuts and strengths of reed, and I must admit that sounded a lot different while playing. Do share your opinions on my playing, what reed you liked better, maybe what the mouthpiece could be, but again, no markings, so that's a tough one, but ya never know.
https://soundcloud.com/user-100691555%2Fold-mouthpeice View: https://soundcloud.com/user-100691555/old-mouthpeice

Pictures to come
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
Subscriber
Messages
1,012
Location
Oneonta, NY
I have nowhere near the knowledge to hazard a guess as to what mouthpiece you've got there, but I will say I like the second reed better. A little less buzz. The sound is cleaner to my ears. Interestingly, I find it to be a darkish, more classical tone. But, my tone is pretty bright and I listen to a lot of alto players with bright tones, so my experience is skewed that way.

Either way, you sound very good on it. I'm sure the combined expertise of the Cafe will solve the mystery.
 

Keep Blowing

Senior Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
1,496
Location
Bottesford England
Hello all,

Whilst rummaging a couple of days ago, I stumbled upon an old mouthpiece I've never been able to identify that I got with my grandfather's broken saxophone, I hadn't tried it before, so I decided that now was as good a time as any.
After using it for maybe twenty minutes, I decided I kind of like it. It's easy to use with many different reeds and strengths and sounds alright too There are absolutely no brandings or markings, but here's a description of the interesting bits:

It's made from hard rubber
It has a tip opening very similar in size to my Optimum AL3
There doesn't seem to be any roll-over or step to the baffle
The baffle is rounded
The side rails are scooped
The rails and tip are not very thin or very thick
The corners between the sides and baffle are rounded
It has a large, round chamber

Using my intuition, I would have thought these characteristics were going to make a dark warm sound (as a matter of fact I was expecting a classical mouthpiece), but I got more of a bright sound with a touch of buzz. I liked it enough to make a recording of myself playing a bit from Skylark with two different cuts and strengths of reed, and I must admit that sounded a lot different while playing. Do share your opinions on my playing, what reed you liked better, maybe what the mouthpiece could be, but again, no markings, so that's a tough one, but ya never know.
https://soundcloud.com/user-100691555%2Fold-mouthpeice View: https://soundcloud.com/user-100691555/old-mouthpeice

Pictures to come
I think the first take just edges it for me,. I like your playing, you sound as though this song means something to you
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
568
Location
France
As stated...pictures. They may also not help. There are hundreds and hundreds of old non labeled mpcs. Some good...some garbage. It may or may not be able to be identified but despite your efforts to describe it the description is of zero use.

Some of them can be made in to useful contemporary pieces but again...you may as well have described it as an old black mpc.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,554
Location
Surrey, UK
The photos don't show much ! They would be better with the mouthpiece just lying on a plain background and properly in focus. Useful information would include the shape of the throat (looking up the bore), the size of the piece, the shape of the shank, the style of the baffle and chamber.

Are there any markings at all on the mouthpiece - lettering, logos, lines ?

Rhys
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
568
Location
France
yes take the photos outside...I see nothing. Even the body shape is difficult to make out.
 

Hassles

Member
Messages
42
Location
Australia
well if you kinda' like it check it out for facing and opening and ensure the rails are even. If not get it checked by a refacer and seek their opinion. I've been there - found an obscure Hard Rubber / brass shank tenor piece which was kinda' nice. A table flattening and "slight opening up" by my refacer had this elevated from kinda' liked to my new favourite tenor piece. It's kinda' t like stumbling upon great grand dad's Ferrari (not actually knowing what it is) and kinda' liking it. So you take if off for a service and tune and then it comes back home - and then you start annoying the neighbours ;-)))
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
568
Location
France
There are a lot of old pieces that can be good...some are pretty dull sounding for jazz or more modern music. Many can be transformed into something rather nice. The job to accomplish this is much more reasonable on alto pieces. Old tenor pieces tend to be super closed and most wont reach the size most players want. With alto it is rarely a struggle to make a small tip into at least a Meyer 6 size which is comfortable for most players. Alto tip sizes have not changed so much as tenor. You can add rollovers and such as well.. The only drawback is that, unless you paid little or nothing for the piece, it can be difficult to sell to recoup your rebuild cost as its still a no name piece. Ive gathered and sold bunches of these types of pieces. They out play student models and I generally sold them for the cost of my reface.

Most piece wont make modern lead pieces as the chambers tend to be large and the floor low... but if you like a darker tone with a warm buzz that blends nicely it is a worthy experiment.
 
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