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Humpty Dumpty

Wade Cornell

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So much nice music posted, so about time for something not so nice.

http://soundcloud.com/whampton-court/humpty-dumpty

This is a rather raw improv based on a simple (strange) repetitive guitar loop that sets up a rhythm we then play off. Soprano sax. Listen for variations on poly-rhythmic ideas. Comments welcome, but it's mainly posted to give a break to so much "tuneful" stuff and stretch some ears.
 

Chris

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Very Dolphy-esqe in places Wade, would be interesting to hear, if the loop changed say half way through...say both tonally and rhythmically..As it is I still had more than a couple of listens through..Nice post...

Chris
 

Mike

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Hi Wade,
You're so humble......

Nice work....It has that character. I especially enjoyed 1:27-1:50. The embracing of the notes were lovely.
You clearly indicate that the individual note is so vitally important to caress. Music, or playing the saxophone, is not about flurries of notes or technical facility, although sure, we need some technical reassurance behind what we play and the technical aspect of music definitely has it's place. However, tasting each note and making it just as important as the next or the previous one is a science soon forgotten.

What I like and respect about about Wade Cornell is that I know he makes love to the note as only Wade can. It's all his own and there's no one who can dismiss that.

Minimalism is a wonderful venture when explaining one's character through sound. Minimalism is usually void of pretense.
We as an ego based character usually choose to bombard the listener with density because we hope that the listener will become marveled at our capabilities.

Wade, you always indicate you play to the listener first but in my opinion you play solely for yourself and again in my opinion that's where true expression will always lie. You were communicating to you and you alone and we as listener's were only getting a glimpse into what you were truly feeling...

Lovely....
 

Wade Cornell

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Thanks Chris and Mike. Glad it found some open ears.

Not sure that I disagree with you Mike as anything with integrity must come from within a player, otherwise it's just a copy of what someone else has done. Also agree that it doesn't take great technique to be unique (I'm certainly an example of that). I don't think it's necessary to be using a pop style to communicate, but also have in the back of my mind that I'm trying to communicate to others. If I've made up my own language then it's just not going to say anything to anyone else. There is within me the need to communicate in the "arts", but that doesn't mean that one should strive to sound like Kenny G or Coltrane. I'd prefer to have my own voice, even if it's not that distinctive.
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
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Good stuff Wade. Always like your guitarist's work and though not usually a fan of sopranino I really enjoyed it.
 

Wade Cornell

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Good stuff Wade. Always like your guitarist's work and though not usually a fan of sopranino I really enjoyed it.

Thanks Andrew. Unless I don't remember correctly it was soprano, not sopranino. The guitarist is a very good match for me as he's not a great technician either, and in fact has trouble thinking in terms of chordal modulation so mainly plays "modal". This gives us both opportunities when he lays down a loop to delve into melodic possibilities. With no "changes" there is nothing much technical to show off, but instead communicate some feeling or mood.

I've played with Gerhard (the guitarist) for around five years, so know how he thinks which makes it easier. Nevertheless I'm usually watching his left hand for clues. This allows us to play (non standard) music in a manner that seems rehearsed when it's total improvisation. Nice when it comes together, but I'm obviously not posting the screw-ups.

I'm lucky enough to play with several fine musicians although not completely sure why they want to play with me as I'm not in their league. Never mind, I count blessings, but generally come back to play with Gerhard regularly as he's a very different and special talent. Glad you can recognize his unique manner of playing. We both think we are improving (would be awful to think otherwise), so at this rate you should hear something really outstanding in another 50 years (I'll be 115 then).
 

Wade Cornell

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Apologies to you Andrew. Egg all over may face! I checked back and it was the nino I played. Strange that I couldn't tell the difference between my nino and sop playing. Guess it all sounds like me regardless of which horn I play.

Cheers.
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
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Loved it. Manages to balance 'out there' with a certain sense of restraint and space... a good combination. The note bends are interesting- bluesy and - well, not bluesy- at the same time.
What's the story with the guitar loop? Was it made specifclaly for you to jam over?
Also- great sopranino tone- none of that thin screeechy thing that really makes a lot of 'nino playing a bit of a trial to listen to....
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
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Yes I had to check it is 'nino and surprisingly I didn't have the local dogs sitting on the doorstep after playing the track.
I like to record a guitar track using a repeated pattern and noodle over it. John Parricelli and Andy Sheppard do this well on their album "P.S".
 

Wade Cornell

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2,120
Loved it. Manages to balance 'out there' with a certain sense of restraint and space... a good combination. The note bends are interesting- bluesy and - well, not bluesy- at the same time.
What's the story with the guitar loop? Was it made specifclaly for you to jam over?
Also- great sopranino tone- none of that thin screeechy thing that really makes a lot of 'nino playing a bit of a trial to listen to....
Thanks Jules.

The guitarist regularly just musically wanders until he finds something he (or I) like then does a loop on the fly. Occasionally he will try to refine it and have me count it out for him if the rhythm is tricky. There isn't much that's preconceived or planned about any of it. We just go with it.

When we play as a trio about half of the material we do is based on loops that the guitarist per-prepares. Those are pieces that we regularly play that are mostly based on ethnic (world music) grooves. I have a love-hate relationship with loops as they free us to play while the machine takes care of business, but it also limits where you can go and potential for variations in tempo.
 
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