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Microphones How to turn clip-on mic wireless?

RichardC82

New Member
Messages
6
Hi folks I'm looking for some guidance on microphones.

Last year I joined a new band and needed a mic pretty quickly. I resisted the urge to splash out loads and bought a Pronomic IM-20 clip on mic (condenser) for my tenor which, to be honest, I'm really pleased with in the gig scenarios I've used it. (I'm about to start recording my own stuff and I appreciate this may turn out to be lacking when I start listening more closely but I'm sticking with it for now)

Anyway, the mic just has a fine cable to an xlr adaptor (mini to normal) and this give me a wired connection to the desk. The desk needs to provide phantom power, if not I have a behringer phantom power supply that I just connect in line. Is there a straightforward and cheap way to make this mic wireless, with a belt pack style transmitter and receiver? I can't find any transmitter that specifically states it will provide phantom power to my mic, without spending a few hundred pounds on something from shure or sennheiser. Even then I'll need to spend further on a receiver.

I have searched the forum already but I can only find people talking about entire set ups, rather than something I could buy as an add-on (unless I've missed it?)

Any help appreciated!
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,699
Most companies' transmitter units have a unique connectors specifically to stop people mixing and matching mics
 

Vetinari

Senior Member
Subscriber
Messages
1,378
Don't know if they are any good but several rx/tx/mic sets less than £50 on amazon. Also don't know if legal in u.k.
 

U CAN CALL ME AL

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
1,112
Hi @RichardC82 many of the purists here may think this is crap but is a fairly simple inexpensive solution. I play sax in a small group and occasionally need to make announcements or attempt to sing

The D606 clips to the bell is well padded and hasn't left any marks yet its performance is acceptable for gigs although it is a dynnamic 'drum mic'. Cost around £20. The dynamic mic is a Sure vocal mic. The wireless set up is an Alesis MicLink with14 channels pairing? Range 60 ft. Cost £70. Simply switch the transmitter adapter from sax to vocal mic when needed. In practice I have found little need to make major adjustments to the PA input level when switching.
The transmitter charges through a usb connector lasts about 4-6 hrs continuous use, and the receiver which plugs into the PA will work using batteries 2xAAA for 5-6 hrs or low voltage adapter, supplied. I've not experienced any problems so far having used it on a number of gigs during the last two years, but I will admit to always taking a cable as back up.
I now await the flak from the audiophile purists amongst us. Al
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Just thinking, there's quite a bit of this sort of kit on the Thomann site. If nothing else, it'll give you a good idea of what's available. Watch the radio frequency, I remember reading that there was a change coming up which would invalidate a lot of kit, not sure if it's happened yet, though.
 

RichardC82

New Member
Messages
6
Hi @RichardC82 many of the purists here may think this is crap but is a fairly simple inexpensive solution. I play sax in a small group and occasionally need to make announcements or attempt to sing

The D606 clips to the bell is well padded and hasn't left any marks yet its performance is acceptable for gigs although it is a dynnamic 'drum mic'. Cost around £20. The dynamic mic is a Sure vocal mic. The wireless set up is an Alesis MicLink with14 channels pairing? Range 60 ft. Cost £70. Simply switch the transmitter adapter from sax to vocal mic when needed. In practice I have found little need to make major adjustments to the PA input level when switching.
The transmitter charges through a usb connector lasts about 4-6 hrs continuous use, and the receiver which plugs into the PA will work using batteries 2xAAA for 5-6 hrs or low voltage adapter, supplied. I've not experienced any problems so far having used it on a number of gigs during the last two years, but I will admit to always taking a cable as back up.
I now await the flak from the audiophile purists amongst us. Al

Thanks for your help U CAN CALL ME AL - I was intrigued by the Alesis MicLink, but saw a poor review on youtube which put me off. Interesting to hear that it works fine for you - what range have you tried it over? I can see me regularly asking it to transmit c. 40ft with people in the way.
 

U CAN CALL ME AL

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
1,112
I can only speak for myself the build is a bit plasticky but careful siting of the receiver will prevent mishap. Usually used over a range of 20-30 ft. Has been reliable with no crossover, interference or drop outs. Have to be honest not tried with people in the way, usually have open stages. Regards Al.
 

U CAN CALL ME AL

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
1,112
The belt pacs that are set up for standard plugs are usually very good and expensive

I have one of these:-

it works well and can be used with the Alesis MicLink. The reason I stopped using it was that the lead attachment to the bell is easy to forget and on two occassions when in a hurry almost dragged the sax off a stand.but if you are more careful (mindful) than me it would be ok.
 
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U CAN CALL ME AL

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
1,112
Thanks tried similar arrangement square metal boxes and round sax bells don't go together well, it tended twist around slide up down etc. but I'm sure with a bit of ingenuity could be made to work. Regards Al
 

OldNotGrey

Member
Messages
110
I have my wireless belt pack attached to the sax to provide complete freedom. Velcro attached to the belt pack, with reciprocal velcro glued onto a 3"x2" hard plastic card which has a couple of holes drilled into it to allow it to be attached to the sax using the key cover plate screws. The mic to belt pack cable can be neatly coiled and secured to keep it out of harms way. Voila! The only problems I've encountered so far have been forgetting to take the receiver out of stand-by mode after a break, just when the song requires that long awaited sax solo is when realisation sets in :(
 

Moondancer

Member
Messages
75
On panto we have been using the wireless belt packs in mic pouches with side straps made from lycra and secured by velcro (imagine a rectangle with a v shape either side) which were sited on the bell of the sax. Would that help? (You can get gold lycra...)
 

Jazzaferri

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,679
I have a foam pad shaped to bell with a Velcro strap that holds the pack to the sax so when I put it down the cord stays with it.

The tech folks at DPA recommended a wireless system to me that wouldn't significantly degrade the sound. It was around $1500 USD and if I wanted a two way (sax and in ear monitors) around $2500. I'd have to look up the email to remember the brand but wired still works better if you have good cables.
 

dooce

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,421
I used a JTS wireless mic/transmitter for several years - cheap and effective but because it screw-clamps onto the bell (a good thing as it kept down the background clatter of the sax's key action), not much use when I started swapping between 3 saxes in my current band.

So I invested in an AKG C519, which I had heard a fellow sax-player using (hard-wired, not wireless) and which sounded very impressive in a live band, and Thomann's own wireless system, TWS16PT model, which is compatible with the AKG. The belt pack just sits in a pocket or clips onto any handy bit of clothing. Overall the set-up cost just over 200 quid.

I'm very impressed with the results so far, and so are the folks that have listened critically to our band's performance. The clamp on the mic is very powerful so despite being easily swapped between numbers, it still doesn't transmit much body noise, and the overall sound, as described to me, is warm and well-detailed.
 
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