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How do you play this?!

Pinkscrapcat

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Hi there, just wondering - the long line coming off the top of the B - how do you play it? I have been going up two notes quickly - is that correct?!
Steph 5808C5D5-43EC-4476-A8BA-39385490DFB0.jpeg
 

Veggie Dave

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I've never seen that before. Perhaps it's the end of a pedal notation to mean 'slow fade'?
 

Dave E

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Think its a gliss up (fast chromatic run, fading). I'll check with our wind band MD this week unless somebody else has answered it by then.
 

GCinCT

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I agree, I'm pretty sure that's a gliss.
 

Veggie Dave

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A gliss normally shows both the start and the end note. I'm not saying it's not a gliss but where are you supposed to end it if it is?
 

rhysonsax

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In Jazz, similar upwards markings include the Lift and the Doit and their downwards counterparts are the Fall and the Plop. The direction and length of the markings usually suggest how and how far you should slide.

A Lift has a gliss (wavy or straight line) going up from the note head without a final note.

A Doit has a slightly curving line going up from the note head which indicates short upward bend of the note.

Rhys
 
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Veggie Dave

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A Lift has a gliss (wavy or straight line) going up from the note head without a final note.

A Doit has a slightly curving line going up from the note head which indicates s short upward bend of the note.

I've never seen either of those. A gliss with start and end note and a drop off, or (apparently) plop, yes, but never a lift or a doit.
 

GCinCT

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I've never seen either of those. A gliss with start and end note and a drop off, or (apparently) plop, yes, but never a lift or a doit.
I do remember seeing those names somewhere. What I do know for sure is that I can’t play any of them. Yet.
 

jbtsax

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From The Articulate Jazz Musicianby Caleb Chapman and Jeff Coffin.
The DOIT (pronounced "doyt" is accomplished for wind instruments by articulating the notated pitch and then forcing the pitch up as much as an octave (or sometimes more). Saxophones will do this by quickly moving chromatically up by fingering pitches combined with a changing shape in the oral cavity. Trumpets accomplish this with a combination of "lipping", "flying fingers", and half-valves. Trombones will use the lip and the slide. The duration of the DOIT is determined by the length and shape of the marking in the music. No individual pitches should be heard after the initial attack.
 
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rhysonsax

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I've never seen either of those. A gliss with start and end note and a drop off, or (apparently) plop, yes, but never a lift or a doit.

I would say that in written jazz music and in transcribed solos the upwards versions at the end of notes are much rarer than the downwards versions.

Lifting at the end of the note can be a really nice effect if used sparingly, unlike the scoop up to pitch at the start of notes which is hugely overused and often done badly.

Rhys
 

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