SYOS

Beginner how do you know when your good enough

tom9437

Member
Messages
175
Hi all i hope you are all well???? Q. How do i know when i am ready to have a go with a band ?? i want to join a local big band{kind of thing} but how does one know when he can read fast enough play fast enough, ect i live in peterborough. thanks Tom.:sax:
 

Nick Cook

Member
Messages
861
Go along and try!!!!

That's what I did. I still sit and do nothing most of the time when I've lost myself, but join in again when I know where I am!!
 

dooce

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,419
Believe me - if you go along and find you aren't quite up to speed, it's the biggest incentive you could have to go away and work a bit harder and then knock 'em out next time! There's nothing to be lost by having a go.
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,661
Believe me - if you go along and find you aren't quite up to speed, it's the biggest incentive you could have to go away and work a bit harder and then knock 'em out next time! There's nothing to be lost by having a go.
Warning -this approach can need quite a thick skin, many a player (myself included) has gone to an event slightly above their standard and come away totally demoralized....
 

half diminished

Senior Member
Messages
1,302
Hi all i hope you are all well???? Q. How do i know when i am ready to have a go with a band ?? i want to join a local big band{kind of thing} but how does one know when he can read fast enough play fast enough, ect i live in peterborough. thanks Tom.:sax:

I think I've always known how good I am and whether I should play in a band. :w00t:
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Big bands can be a good first band to play in. There's usually so much going on that it doesn't stand out like a sore thumb if you get lost and drop out for a bit, as long as you're not on a lead part. You also often find some, err, interesting characters in big bands.
 

dooce

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,419
Warning -this approach can need quite a thick skin, many a player (myself included) has gone to an event slightly above their standard and come away totally demoralized....

Having seen Fat 45, I cannot believe this can ever have happened to you Jools

:)
 

Jules

Formerly known as "nachoman"
Messages
4,661
Having seen Fat 45, I cannot believe this can ever have happened to you Jools

:)
Why thank you sir... and, as you'll have seen, where technical proficiency fails me- energy level and bravado step in! >:)
 

Amaranth

Member
Messages
176
I'm rubbish but I lurve playing in a band and 6 months on I now get very nice comments - pick the tunes you play carefully and aim to "add to" rather than "take over" is my mantra.
Got bloomin you tubed again at Tuesday shed practise - very un-nerving I can tell you.
 
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Sue

If at first you don't succeed try try try a Gin
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2,391
Tom, I'd say if you can find a band locally contact them and explain that you're inexperienced but keen and want to improve. Go along and sit in on rehearsals - the other players will be willing to help you out and offer advise. Play what you can and listen to the band whilst following your dots if you can't keep up to begin with. One thing is for certain - you will definitely improve if you do join a band and you have the commitment to practice. Very best of luck.
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
857
Hi all i hope you are all well???? Q. How do i know when i am ready to have a go with a band ?? i want to join a local big band{kind of thing} but how does one know when he can read fast enough play fast enough, ect i live in peterborough. thanks Tom.:sax:

You don't. You have to go along and do your best. Listen to the advice of fellow players. As has been mentioned, if you lose your place try to follow the music until you find a re-entry point. Bum notes are not usually a problem in biggish bands, at least during practice sessions, but keeping time is so concentrate on that.

All the players in a band had to start at some point, now may be your time.

Cheers

Martin
 

Mikec

Member
Messages
196
Another approach is to find yourself some other players of a similar standard and outlook and play with them. Nothing quite so formal as forming your own band, just get a few friends together to play. It's much less stressful than struggling to play stuff you don't know well. As Jules said that can be very demoralizing. Conversely, it can bring you on in leaps and bounds. I think the real answer is to have a go; if it doesn't work don't flog yourself over it, practice more and try again in a year or so.
 

Moz

Senior Member
Messages
857
Another approach is to find yourself some other players of a similar standard and outlook and play with them. Nothing quite so formal as forming your own band, just get a few friends together to play. It's much less stressful than struggling to play stuff you don't know well. As Jules said that can be very demoralizing. Conversely, it can bring you on in leaps and bounds. I think the real answer is to have a go; if it doesn't work don't flog yourself over it, practice more and try again in a year or so.


But surely playing with a new group of 'similar standard' players, they would ONLY play the tunes they know. Without someone to push, inertia reigns.

Again though, just try it.

Martin
 

Mikec

Member
Messages
196
But surely playing with a new group of 'similar standard' players, they would ONLY play the tunes they know. Without someone to push, inertia reigns.

Again though, just try it.

Martin

It's entirely possible to push yourself and each other and move forward together in easily manageable steps. It's easy to decide to play at least one new tune each time, for instance, and choose one that advances by a small or large increment. Throwing yourself into a completely unknown and very advanced situation isn't the ONLY way to do it, though it may work for some at some time.
 
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