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HMV away. Just waiting for the confirmation

Clivey

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,027
Yip After Virgin. I suppose it was only a matter of time. 4500 UK Jobs on the line Not Good.

The sad thing is I can`t even remember my last purchase. :(
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,273
Bad times ahead :( but you do have to ask yourself what have they done with all the previous millions of profits they made ?
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,090
I can remember them coming and now they're going. It's the internet age. Who goes in a record shop anymore? I used to buy on line from HMV but Amazon is much cheaper with a better range.

You have to keep up with trends. No good focusing on the kids downloading singles, when the oldies are spending replacing their vinyl and exploring the archives for stuff they missed at the time.

Virgin is only a brand label to stick on their latest aquisition
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
Subscriber
Messages
5,946
Oh dear this is bad news. First of all the likes of HMV and Virgin put the small independents out of business because they couldn't compete with the loss-leaders and all the rest that the big chains could do. Then along come internet sellers who find loop holes that allow them to not pay VAT etc and so undercut the stores.

Call me old-fashioned, but I like to browse through CDs. Over the years I have mostly used one of two independents - they have both stopped trading. I have over 2,500 CDs. With their loss, I use HMV. My nearest stores are about 50 miles away, or I visit Oxford St. when I'm in London. So I don't buy that often these days, but I buy a lot when I do.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
The way things are going, in ten years the high streets will be empty, except for isolated survivors. Not just records, but all the other goods - bedding, clothes, shoes, furniture. We're sacrificng hands on, assistant aided purchasing for anonymous cheap online purchases. Not sure if it's good or not, but Amazon and co are changing the way we live.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
Kev, you are supporting the nation that is pushing LIDL and ALDI into our High Streets, underpricing poor ASDA. Hang on, they're American aren't they.>:)>:)>:)

Perhaps we could learn something about not buying musical instruments, mouthpieces, reeds, ligatures, cases, straps and music from our local dealers rather than the 'net. Some go to a shop for a demonstration and then buy from the cheapest source. Possibly immoral?
 

MLoosemore

Deluded Senior Member...
Messages
759
If I had a local dealer to purchase reeds etc then I would.... but I object to doing a 50 mile round trip in the car. Perhaps I could take a bus or train?? Well yes if I can afford to spend all day getting there and back not to mention the cost of the ticket.

Unfortunately the internet wins hands down.... Call it progress or evolution it has always been thus.... Things change.
 

Dave McLaughlin

Sesquipedalian
Subscriber
Messages
305
If I had a local dealer to purchase reeds etc then I would.... but I object to doing a 50 mile round trip in the car. Perhaps I could take a bus or train?? Well yes if I can afford to spend all day getting there and back not to mention the cost of the ticket.

Unfortunately the internet wins hands down.... Call it progress or evolution it has always been thus.... Things change.
If you know what you want, and just want to buy it, then I don't see anything terribly wrong with that. What I think is immoral is going to a shop, trying a range of saxes, or mouthpieces, or cameras, and then buying one online.

Some retailers don't help. I'm currently waiting for a pair of glasses that I ordered last week. I ordered them from the shop where I had the eye test, although I could have got them cheaper elsewhere. I felt I owed it to them for being able to give me an evening appointment the same day I phoned (although when I turned up they had no record of it, and after I'd ordered them they said 7-10 working days, when last time they made them in an hour or two).
 

MLoosemore

Deluded Senior Member...
Messages
759
If you know what you want, and just want to buy it, then I don't see anything terribly wrong with that. What I think is immoral is going to a shop, trying a range of saxes, or mouthpieces, or cameras, and then buying one online...
I agree Dave. As for the level of service in some local shops? If they can't compete on price then it is only good service which will keep us in the High Street.
 

dram

New Member
Messages
16
ALDI and LIDL are German and you are right ASDA is American. In some cases on line retailers do it from a small shop, sometimes in out of the way places. Our village hardware shop is one such. A hardware shop could not survive in our village without the internet sales. So, its not all negative.
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
8,901
fter buying a few things in Comet and getting terrible customer service I then did just go in to see the range of products and buy elsewhere.
For example I bought a dvd recorder from them, it went faulty and they send it to their repairer for 6 weeks, it comes back 'no fault found'.
Which means it's still wrong and has to go back for another 6 weeks and then they reluctantly refund.
Next dvd recorder from Amazon went wrong after nearly a year replaced immediately without question.
If you get better service on-line then that's where you buy.
Comet's gone bust, a bit inconvenient because I have to go somewhere else to look round.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
What needs to happen with the move to on-line sales is that manufacturers will need to fund showroom/try out facilities. There they can ensure knowledgable staff and (although it pains me) sales targetted at their range, not helping the customer to select the best for their needs across different brands.

Apple's stores would be a good example of how this can evolve.

This is OK for the bigger buys, but won't fund showrooms for reeds for instance.

But it's our own fault - we put price first, often our decision about supplier is base on price, even saving a few pounds on a thousand pound instrument will swing decide where we buy from.

One recent example from my house - my daughter decided to buy a new phone with her Christmas and Birthday money. She opted to go for a 2-4 week delivery because it saved her a couple of Euros. She could have had it next day from the same supplier. But she'd seen it at the lower price one one of these best deal type web sites and wasn't prepared to pay extra. It looked to me as if the supplier was advertising a lower price there just to get the high position in front of competitors, cos you couldn't find that price going normally into their site.

I remember lecturing on intro to computers courses in the 80s, the job was to show bank managers how computers would change/improve their jobs, and to give them an understanding of what went into programming/system design, so they'd understand better why things were that way. One of the things we talked about, pre-internet, was the move to on-line shopping and the effect it'd have. And now we're seeing as reality what was forcast all those years ago. We're heading towards perfect competition between retailers with all that means.
 

navarro

Senior Member
Messages
863
Hi Being of the age I am ,I remember when record shops where the social hub for all to meet and discuss latest releases etc. Booths with earphones so you could listen before you purchased. But what is gone is gone and the future is obviously the internet.

But, and I pose this question how long before the internet wars begin where droid fights droid for the market share. Will the top dog win and us the consumer left with no choice. Google are already making serious inroads into services and subtly locking us into a no escape situation.

The losers are us, victims of, as suggested in an earlier thread of re-investment policies which favour touch button technology as opposed to human endevour.

Asimov`s `I Robot `is alive and well with no Will Smith to combat it for us. Regards Written from the shelter of my supersterile cocoon. (Harrods Sale} N.
 

MLoosemore

Deluded Senior Member...
Messages
759
Hi Being of the age I am ,I remember when record shops where the social hub for all to meet and discuss latest releases etc. Booths with earphones so you could listen before you purchased. But what is gone is gone and the future is obviously the internet. ...
Ah those were the days before the scene got corrupted by HMV, Virgin and other megastores... :)

I remember going into my local shop in Dorset looking for a Ruby Murray song and being told they didn't have it on 45 but would I like to take it on a 10 inch 78..... Of course I did
 
Messages
509
Dammit my son gave me a voucher for Christmas guess thats gone down the swanee
But more seriously,more poor beggers joining the dole
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,125
This is a very delicate subject for me.

Since I moved to the UK I worked for Virgin/Zavvi (Jazz department, Oxford street) and HMV, both Oxford street branches (Jazz and classical).

I went through Zavvi's administration and left HMV sinking boat less than one year ago.

A big hug for my ex colleagues.

My deep disrespect for managers.

I have been planning to write some sort of analysis of the possible reasons of such a shameful management of the whole industry, the lies they tell (blaming digital download is one of them) the stupidity of their choices (i.e. the brilliant idea of starting to sell clothes).
Think about it: the whole back catalog costs almost nothing, printing a CD costs almost nothing, hiring competent sales assistants costs almost nothing.... and they managed to go busted.

I will accept suggestion about the best way/place/form to write my useless thoughts, but please keep in mind that English is not my first language.
 
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dubrosa22

Senior Member
Messages
413
I'm saddened by the worldwide demise of retail but gladdened in my heart by the rekindled reemergence of speciality stores.

For every HMV, Sanity, VirginMegastore, and what not that closes down in Sydney, Melbourne - and hopefully elsewhere - the small independent jazz record shops and secondhand shops still survive.
Okay, 95% of these were systematically wiped out over the past 25 years but ones that have survived are actually staying afloat. They're not in the high street but down a laneway or in a basement or 4 floors up but they live! :)

Good music, films and books are still valued and enough people - at least in major cities - like to browse physical stores that specialise in them and have staff who actually have knowledge about their stock and can recommend things. Now if only younger people realised/experienced this and if only smaller cities, towns and villages could once again support these stores too we'd have a resurrection :)

Online shopping is cheaper, easier and sometimes faster but people still like to take a walk during their lunch break and browse/buy or when visiting a city check out a cool music store (that is if they can find it!).

There's always a place in big cities for speciality retail. The problem is what happens when the majority of music labels go all digital and cease CD production? It may not happen until a profitable non-invasive DRM system is worked out (between iTunes and Google something will come out) but it will happen.

It's hard to be a physical record shop without physical product!


Sent from my Xperia
 

dubrosa22

Senior Member
Messages
413
Sound quality on SACD, DVD-Audio, XRCD, SMH-CD is far superior.
I have many SACD and DVD-Audio discs but the market for them is tiny. And everyday CDs market is drying up too - the racks are getting smaller at the large chains (that are still running).


Sent from my Xperia
 
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