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Hi guys, need a lil' help with theory (grade 3)..

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Right, I've been filling out my grade 3 theory book and at the end (well nearly) there's a question that asks: What does 'Andante con moto' mean? I know these terms seperately but what do they translate as all together? At walking speed with movement? I thought walking meant movement anyway, lol. Please help (let me know if I'm being 'blonde' - hahaha).

Fi

P.S.: How are you lot? Long time no speak.
 

kernewegor

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I guess in 17th century Italy andante con moto was the equivalent of "walking with a swing".

Think St Louis Blues!
 
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Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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As you say, "andante" is usually interpreted as 'walking pace' so steady and not too slow. "Con moto" is as you say 'with movement' so its telling you to give it a bit more, in other words a bit quicker. I like the idea of 'andante con fuoco' - steadily with fury :shocked:

If you plan on doing more theory, it's probably worth getting a music dictionary - they're not expensive. As you progress you're going to need help with terms like "L'istesso tempo" or "stringendo" etc.
 
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TomMapfumo

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If you plan on doing more theory you could always switch to the following: http://www.popularmusictheory.org/ which uses english words and is more appropriate for more jazz, rock, blues & popular music. They are of equal academic status to the classical theory grades, just not that widely known about.

I completed my grade 3 a few years ago.
 

jbtsax

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I was taught that all Italian musical terms mean the same thing, "Watch The Conductor". ;}
 

kernewegor

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I've often wondered why symphony orchestras feel the need to have someone from the local 'bus company stand in front of them doing an impersonation of someone out of Harry Potter...
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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I've often wondered why symphony orchestras feel the need to have someone from the local 'bus company stand in front of them doing an impersonation of someone out of Harry Potter...
Smaller orchestras often take their lead from the... err... leader (1st violinist).

Wind the clock back to C18th and the conductor (who was often the composer) would sit at the harpsichord facing the orchestra. He would direct from the keyboard and fill in the harmony (known as playing continuo).

In the late C17th, someone would mark time with a stick (as in a large (shoulder height) swagger stick (bonus for the one to name the composer/conductor who stabbed his foot with the stick and died from blood poisoning as a result).

It was also common for the first violinist to conduct with his bow, whilst standing at the front.

With orchestras getting bigger in late C18th and into the C19th you needed someone at the front to keep everyone together and to provide cues.
 
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