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Hi from N Ireland

Kat Armstrong

New Member
Messages
3
Just joined today. I'm based in the West of Northern Ireland and have finally seen the light after years of playing the flute. I started on Alto a few years ago just to see what it sounded like and took the plunge and bought a Bari last year.

I'm looking to pick everyones brains about Baris, I have very little little fingers but I love playing my beast so need to find a solution :)

I play in Fermanagh Concert Band. Sometimes flute, mostly Bari, and occasionally flute with my bari on my knee ...
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Hi Kat, and a VERY WARM WELCOME to the cafe.
I havn't played a bari since 1965, so I am not qualified to give advice on the matter.
However one thing springs to mind, you could try hanging weights on all of your fingers and sleeping face down on an ironing board.

Believe me it gets worse on here. So please join in.

johnboy
 

Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,667
Hi Kat, I can't help with the Bari question (I only picked mine up on Friday) but hey welcome to the cafe anyway!
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
6,007
I'm looking to pick everyones brains about Baris, I have very little little fingers but I love playing my beast so need to find a solution :)

Pick away. Solution to what? Growing longer fingers? I realise it's a bit late since you've already got one, but some baris suit smaller hands better than others.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Hi Kat, and a big welcome to Cafe Sax from the Skabertawe Horn Section. Never played a Bari, but I do play a Tenor Trombone which has the same range, and produces a lovely sound!

Hope to hear all about what you get up to on Bari and stuff....!
Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

Andante cantabile

Senior Member
Messages
696
I have a YBS-32 which doesn't require big hands. Every key is easy to reach, in fact as easy as those on the YTS-82z. Recently I also bought a Phil Barone Vintage tenor which requires a slightly bigger reach. I found that doing lots of exercises that engage the pinkies really helped. (I discovered that doing so also leads to other benefits). Even if I knew what bari you have, I couldn't give you any advice on it since I have never even touched another one. But doing exercises with the pinkies may help a little.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
Welcome to the caff, Kat.

If you'd like to loan me your bari, you can borrow my tenor as a halfway finger-stretching house.

Mind you, it would be best to remember that one of the rules of the CaSLM is, "What's yours is mine and what's mine, is also mine."
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Hi Kat
I'm sure I recall an Irish folksong where the person had a shillelegh on their knee, rather than a baritone. Perhaps the song's been updated. The baritone is probably more dangerous.
Welcome anyway!
YC
 

Sunray

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,708
Saxy Kat ...

Hey Hey Kat ... *Sunray waves*

By now you will have noticed that this lot love to have "a bit of fun" and are willing to help out with questions etc ...

I am new here as well ... and I have Alto and Tenor to keep me occupied ...

Sorry I can't offer any advice at this point ... but never say never ... ;}

PS Johnboy - almost made me fall off my chair when I read his reply - :thankyou:Johnboy
 

Kat Armstrong

New Member
Messages
3
Thanks for the warm welcome everyone :) My current bari is a John Packer, bought for the very high tech reason that it was the cheapest one on the market that wasn't on eBay from China ;) I bought it to see if I liked playing bari, with the intention of donating it to someone else as a swap for a tenor if I didn't like it. Needless to say I've fallen in love with pretending to be a tugboat but I now need to upgrade. The tone is fine up to G, above that it starts sounding a bit like an Oboe!

I have a decent(ish) budget for a new horn, so I'm planning to hit some shops and have some fun :)

Snake is a Carolina Corn Snake, 5 weeks old. Very cute and moves like lightening!
 

gladsaxisme

Try Hard Die Hard
Subscriber
Messages
3,435
Hi Kat

Welcome to the cafe from up here in Manchester,I get to meet a lot of the M.U. Irish contingent in my job as a cabbie ,always a nice friendly bunch.Flute to Bari that's one heck of a jump.I'm dreaming of getting one myself,my tutor let me play one he was using once and I really liked it a ybs nice finger spacing ,but I've really been trying to curb the GAS lately so who knows what will happen enjoy the cafe...john
 
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BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,922
Thanks for the warm welcome everyone :) My current bari is a John Packer, bought for the very high tech reason that it was the cheapest one on the market that wasn't on eBay from China ;) I bought it to see if I liked playing bari, with the intention of donating it to someone else as a swap for a tenor if I didn't like it. Needless to say I've fallen in love with pretending to be a tugboat but I now need to upgrade. The tone is fine up to G, above that it starts sounding a bit like an Oboe!

I have a decent(ish) budget for a new horn, so I'm planning to hit some shops and have some fun :)

Before you spend a fortune on a new sax, you could try:

a) playing some scales/long notes above the G for a week or two to see if the sound improves.
b) upgrading the mouthpiece. Never played bari so I wouldn't know what to suggest, but a new Yamaha mp on my cheapo alto made a big difference.

It strikes me (and I'm only a beginner on sax so I don't claim to be a great authority) that a lot of nonsense gets talked about woodwind instruments and their tone. When all's said and done the instrument is only a resonating chamber. If it's mechanically OK and in tune, it should sound OK. Tone seems to be much more a question of embouchure, breathing and mouthpiece. Maybe a great player will notice a difference in the response of the instrument to various harmonics, but for most of us...

Back when I was playing clarinet I found out that the principal carinet in the LPO (forget his name) played a week at Glyndebourne on a B&H plastic Regent clarinet (about £30 at the time -- 1970's) while his main insrument waas being overhauled. No one noticed.

If you must buy a new instrument, why not try a tenor/alto/sop?

Cheers,

Martin
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
Following on with the possible mouthpiece issue (you may have a great one, who knows?) Both the Yamaha and Rico Graftonite/ Metalite
mouthpieces have good recommendations and can be bought just above/below the £20 mark. For the Rico I would highly recommend www.rapidreeds.com - cheapest I have found so far. Or even a more expensive mouthpiece may make the difference, rather than a new beast. Previously, after purchasing a Yanagisawa T901 Tenor I was particularly worried by the thinness in the upper register - even with the Yani HR 6 mouthpiece and Vandoren Java T55. After some research/testing I settled on a Francois Louis Spectruoso T280 ML - which was just right (and was an 8, rather than the 6's I had been trying beforehand). So, it is not always the sax, and other things can be tried first which can save quite a bit of money.

Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
6,007
It strikes me (and I'm only a beginner on sax so I don't claim to be a great authority) that a lot of nonsense gets talked about woodwind instruments and their tone. When all's said and done the instrument is only a resonating chamber. If it's mechanically OK and in tune, it should sound OK. Tone seems to be much more a question of embouchure, breathing and mouthpiece. Maybe a great player will notice a difference in the response of the instrument to various harmonics, but for most of us...

Your right about the nonsense, but I suspect you've not played many different saxes. You don't have to be 'great' to able to tell the difference between them. If I lend pupils my sax they don't usually want to give it back.
Back when I was playing clarinet I found out that the principal carinet in the LPO (forget his name) played a week at Glyndebourne on a B&H plastic Regent clarinet (about £30 at the time -- 1970's) while his main insrument waas being overhauled. No one noticed.

Good players can make any old piece of crap sound good. Beginners can't. They're helped greatly by using a good instrument.

If you must buy a new instrument, why not try a tenor/alto/sop?

Burn the heretic!

She's got a bari. Why would she want one of them weedy things?>:)
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
You have to appreciate that a Baritone Sax is simply an overcomplicated and excessively heavy version of a Tenor Trombone, which weighs in at just over a kilo, and has exactly the same range. That a BS is approximately 7x the price of a TT is criminal. All you have to do with the TT is hold it and blow, whilst occasionally moving one wrist....................;}

If you want to make money set up a Woodwind Company!:w00t:

Only joking.....
Kind regards
Tom:cool:
 
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