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HELP - Really p****d off and perplexed

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
I bought a Meyer mouthpiece about 3 months ago for around £130. I have not dropped it or done anything careless. However, I have just noticed that there is a major crack in the top half (see photo). I honestly don't know how this has happed. I am always very careful with my instrument. Could it be a design fault which would mean I would get a replacement from the manufacturer (via the shop I bought it from)? Is this a common or at least known problem with some mouthpieces? If I had dropped it then at least I could blame myself. However, since I have done nothing careless I really do feel like it must be a faulty mouthpiece.

Please can someone advise what I should do?

Thanks
 

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Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,661
Perhaps you could contact them to see if it's a common fault, other than that you would possibly have to prove that you were not the cause of this damage. I wish you luck.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Hmm.

Sorry, mate, but that's not a crack, it's a huge lump knocked off the end of the mouthpiece. I've been playing sax for nearly thirty years and I've only ever seen damage like that caused by accident. However it has happened, I think the retailer is likely to think the same. If you (or anyone else) haven't dropped it, then try the retailer, but I don't hold out much hope. Ebonite (unlike wood) doesn't have much of a reputation for just splitting of its own accord.

Good luck

Jon
 

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
Thanks for your feedback. I promise you that I have not dropped it on the floor or a hard surface (that I would remember) but I guess it is possible that I have tapped it on a hard surface (I cannot recall doing this but whilst racking my brains it is the only possible explanation I can think of). However, are these things so delicate that a simple tap could cause it to split?
I have already emailed the retailer and await their reply.
If all comes back negative, is it possible to superglue ebonite mouthpieces together again? At least as a temporary measure until I can afford a new one?
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Supporter
Messages
13,954
I also think this is a tough one. I believe you, but if I was a retailer or if someone sent me back a mouthpiece like that I would think for sure it had been dropped. It's actually not even down to whether they believe you because if they did and sent you another mouthpiece, they then have to claim for the replacement off of the distributor or manufacturer, who will also think "blimey, this has been dropped or abused in some way.

One explanation is that they broke it in the shop and did an invisible repair before selling it I hope nobody would be so unscrupulous, but you never know. If that is the case you'd never be able to prove it sadly.

I think the good news may be that it's repairable, I'm sure superglue should be a reasonably permanent repair, and AFAIK it should also be a non toxic repair (don't quote me on it, I'd hate to see that as your epitaph)
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
On the superglue - it's not really suitable, it's not waterproof. Epoxy would be a better bet.

Try pm'ing Morgan Fry, he may be able to help. Then, depending what Morgan says, try the retailer. There's always a chance.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
I wasn't doubting that you hadn't dropped it, just thinking of what the retailer would think.

Kev's right about normal superglue, but there is also a food safe version designed for repairing broken cups, etc. That would probably do, and if I recall it is certified by the US FDA as safe for human contact, so should be reassuringly non-toxic.
 

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
I wasn't doubting that you hadn't dropped it, just thinking of what the retailer would think.

Kev's right about normal superglue, but there is also a food safe version designed for repairing broken cups, etc. That would probably do, and if I recall it is certified by the US FDA as safe for human contact, so should be reassuringly non-toxic.
Hi jonf,
No worries, I know you did not doubt me. However, after lots of feedback I can only assume that I must have done something to it without being aware of it! I have already had an email back from the store asking me to bring it on, although I am doubtful they will offer a replacement as they have already said they have never come across a mouthpiece breaking on its own accord. Therefore I think I am going to have to put it down to one of life's little mysteries and buy a new one. In the mean time I will try the gluing option - my teacher has offered to fix if for me as he has had lots of experience mending model planes in his time and so he will know better about what type of glue to use and how to fix it.

Thanks to everyone for your help.
Ben
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Hi Ben,
Sorry to hear of your predicament. If you need to resort to a repair, the way I would go about it, is to get something made of a similar material and colour (an old m'piece?). Take a smooth file to it to produce a pile of black dust, which you then mix with araldite to make a black paste. Fill the gap, and when set, carefully remove the excess adhesive and BINGO an invisible repair, which will be stronger than adhesive alone.
My father, a Cabinet-maker, told me their creed - "In glue and dust we put our trust".

John.
 
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nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
Hi Ben,
Sorry to hear of your predicament. If you need to resort to a repair, the way I would go about it, is to get something made of a similar material and colour (an old m'piece?). Take a smooth file to it to produce a pile of black dust, which you then mix with araldite to make a black paste. Fill the gap, and when set, carefully remove the excess adhesive and BINGO an invisible repair.
My father, a Cabinet-maker, told me their creed - "In glue and dust we put our trust".

John.
Thanks John. May try that.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Hi Ben,
Sorry to hear of your predicament. If you need to resort to a repair, the way I would go about it, is to get something made of a similar material and colour (an old m'piece?). Take a smooth file to it to produce a pile of black dust, which you then mix with araldite to make a black paste. Fill the gap, and when set, carefully remove the excess adhesive and BINGO an invisible repair, which will be stronger than adhesive alone.
My father, a Cabinet-maker, told me their creed - "In glue and dust we put our trust".

John.
If you do this on a mouthpiece, you'll never get the broken off bit back in the right place, the glue layer will be too thick. But it's a great technique for filling gaps and gluing surfaces that are rather rough, where the glue layer needs to be thick.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Oh I'm sorry guys, from your description I didn't think you had the broken piece (I would still fill it though).

John.
 
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johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
I thought some more about this. As it's a small gap, stick a piece of sellotape accross the gap on the inside. Then if you are filling it , the tape will support the drying adhesive, leaving a smooth inner surface requiring minimal clean up. If sticking the piece back in, the tape will hold the piece flush with the inner surface - same result.The adhesive will not adhere to the sticky side of the tape.

John.
 

nakedlunch

Member
Messages
95
Hi all,

Think I am going to buy a new mouthpiece next week. Can anyone confirm whether it is true or not that a metal mouthpiece would be more durable than other materials if it was knocked or accidently dropped? Not that I am planning to be anything other than very careful with my new mouthpiece. However, durability seems to be a big factor for me now as I kind of want to avoid having the same mishap as before (presuming that it was caused by me unknowingly damageing it!)

Any advice would be helpful.

Cheers
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Please at least try the repair I suggested, and you might save yourself a lot of cash. There will not be a problem with the repair (no toxicity and the sound will not be impaired), it will be as good as new.
If you must buy a metal m'piece, then yes they are more durable, but the choice for you is very risky given your proficiency!!
Once again I stress, try the repair. If you don't feel confident, get your tutor to do it. If he makes model planes, he is used to the materials involved and it will be a simple job for him (I should think about ten/fifteen minutes).

John.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
Depends on what it's made from. Most are brass, which is pretty soft and easy to bend a tip. Stainless steel is much harder. I did once drop a stainless stees Berg Larsen Duckbill, and it caused no damage. To the mouthpiece, that is. It landed on my foot, and it bloody hurt.
 

singlereed

Member
Messages
124
Anton Weinberg is good for repairing mouthpieces and his work is reasonably priced. You'll find him at Dawkes at Maidenhead.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
I'm sorry but this is a really easy repair!!! give it to your tutor!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

John.
 

MartinL

Member
Messages
366
Please at least try the repair I suggested, and you might save yourself a lot of cash. There will not be a problem with the repair (no toxicity and the sound will not be impaired), it will be as good as new.
If you must buy a metal m'piece, then yes they are more durable, but the choice for you is very risky given your proficiency!!
Once again I stress, try the repair. If you don't feel confident, get your tutor to do it. If he makes model planes, he is used to the materials involved and it will be a simple job for him (I should think about ten/fifteen minutes).

John.
I once a acquired a damaged mouthpiece with a second hand sax. It was a Yamaha with a huge groove in it from teeth. As it was a Yam and worth a bash I repaired it in the way described, finished off with a patch. And there you are a fully usable mouthpiece. It does work.
 
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