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Help - My Neck is Stuck !

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,383
I've been playing quite a lot recently and leaving my new BW M2 tenor on the stand for easy access (although I have been taking the mouthpiece and reed off and cleaning/storing them properly).

Yesterday I tried to take the neck off to use the pull-through on the body and swab out the neck. It just won't shift at all.

The fit of the tenon was fairly tight in the socket, but not ridiculously so. Now it seems to have seized up completely and I don't want to force it and bend or break something.

Does anyone have tips for how to safely shift it this time and for how to prevent it happening again ? Maybe some selective warming up might help the socket to expand.

Thanks

Rhys
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
Hi Rhys, short of taking it to a tech (which i would probably do by the way) is to remove the screw that tightens the neck in the socket, wrap some insulating tape around a wide bladed screwdriver and see if you can gently ease the gap apart by twisting the screwdriver, not ideal i know or the other way pour some hot water (not boiling) over the joint this may expand the socket just enough to free the neck, and to prevent it from happening again? put a smidgen of cork grease around the neck joint before re-assembly.
good look....
 

O.C.V.

Member
Messages
113
The hot water tip is a good one. I've used it to free stuck trumpet tuning slides in the past. If you can get it, the best grease for this sort of joint that I have found is silicone grease. I think it can be obtained from electrical suppliers such as RS. You need such small amounts and it last so long that I am still using a tube that my father had from his radio and TV business, and he retired in 1968!
Good luck
O.C.V.
 

MMM

Senior Member
Messages
914
Rhys,

get hold of some Plusgas, I use it a lot: it is like WD40 but in a liquid form so it doesn't squirt everywhere, remove the top keys on the body (this is for good measure so no 'oil' gets on the pads (so top F, F#, side D/E/F), lay the sax flat on a table (so the oil doesn't run down the body) and leave some Plusgas to seep into the neck receiver (in particular in the slot by the neck screw. Leave it overnight, try moving it a fraction, if it moves leave it and repeat until it moves without major force.
Please use the Plusgas sparingly as it will go everywhere. When the neck comes off, make sure you wipe all the oil off the body/bore.
I have to admit, I have never had to deal with an incident like that, alhough I had a lady come around who tried removing a stuck neck: the neck came off but the tenon was left in the receiver!

Whatever you do, do not force the neck off the body!
Good luck and report back,
M.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

MMM

Senior Member
Messages
914
Sorry forgot to say two things:
to remove the excess oil you can use lighter fluid as a degreaser and after you've cleaned the oil off, re install the keys otherwise it will sound weird! :)))

Cheers,
M.
 

Justin Chune

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,013
I would warm up the socket with a hair dryer and apply some WD40 to the joint. Then I would try some sideways motion before trying to remove it. Grease is not something I would use on a sax neck, and I keep mine clean with T Cut/Brasso, if they ever need it.

Before doing any or the above, I would have a good practice session and then try to get the neck off.

O.V.C. I used to have tubes of silicone grease at work, and never thought to use it on my clarinet and sax corks. Thanks for the tip.

Jim.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
I'd do none of this. Back to the dealers, they get it off and get the fit sorted out.
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
I'd do none of this. Back to the dealers, they get it off and get the fit sorted out.
With hindsight, this is probably the best course of action to take, assuming that it is still under warranty.
Whatever you do DO NOT use wd40 or similar products as these contain a solvent, and may, i'm not saying they will, just may, mark or stain the lacquer in which case your warranty may be void....
 

saxyman

Member
Messages
267
I am surprised that its so tight that its difficult to remove. I imagine most of the solutions given could be used with a great deal of care.
I think if you took it to a technician, he would in all probability use one of those methods, (I stand ready to be corrected here, if so then I deserve it). I personally would consider wrapping a hot damp (not dripping) cloth around the socket, just enough to cause it to expand slightly. Bearing in mind that the neck and socket are made of the same metal, they will normally expand at the same rate so the trick is only to get the socket warm enough to ease the joint.
I have myself used a faint smear of grease on the neck, but I am aware that this can attract dirt and grit, so I meticulously clean it regularly. Always the best option is preventative maintenance.
 
Messages
509
We are fortunate here to have Griff and Stephen Howard to call on for advice and i think in your place that is what i would do,after all this is what they do.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,383
It's free again !

I was sort of waiting for Griff or Steve to chime in, but then I thought I might as well give it a go.

I followed Fraser's suggestion and used a screwdriver blade to ease apart the socket. It didn't take much before the neck was moving again. It is now fitting just right.

There was a sort of powdery residue on the inside of the socket and on the outside of the tenon as well as some small corrosion deposits on the tenon. I think the powder may have something to do with the silver finish or the lacquer.

Thanks everybody and lesson learned: always dismantle and swab out after playing.

Rhys
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
*
I followed Fraser's suggestion and used a screwdriver blade to ease apart the socket. It didn't take much before the neck was moving again. It is now fitting just right.
Cheers Rhys, glad to be of assistance......Now one good turn deserves another and i know you have a few Lawtons, do you have an 8*BB Tenor you would be willing to sell? thanks....
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Rhys, cleaning the tenon and socket with a silver cloth does a good job of getting any muck out, and leaves a miniscule residue of oil that doesn't attract dirt.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,383
Cheers Rhys, glad to be of assistance......Now one good turn deserves another and i know you have a few Lawtons, do you have an 8*BB Tenor you would be willing to sell? thanks....
Good try ! I have got a couple of Lawton ICONs in the BB model, but they are 7star and I'm holding onto them. The only other high baffle piece I have which I might let go is a Theo Wanne Kali, also in 7*, but that has a large chamber (unlike the Lawton).

Rhys, cleaning the tenon and socket with a silver cloth does a good job of getting any muck out, and leaves a miniscule residue of oil that doesn't attract dirt.
Good idea, now where did I put that silver cleaning cloth I used to have ?

Thanks

Rhys
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
I have got a couple of Lawton ICONs in the BB model, but they are 7star
ICONs? oh that's the cheapo Lawton's nobody likes much, yeah one of those will have to do i guess...Ha Ha!

Never really fancied the Wann's, i'm sure they are good but way over priced and look, well a bit poncy for want of a better word....

Now take care, and for Petes? sake get some cork grease on that neck joint......
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Never really fancied the Wann's, i'm sure they are good but way over priced and look, well a bit poncy for want of a better word....
You're going to have Davey after you....
Now take care, and for Petes? sake get some cork grease on that neck joint......
Not a good idea, it holds grit/dirt, which scores the tenon and socket. I used to do it, but there are definite marks/damage on my tenor. And our sax techs both advise against it.
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,910
Not a good idea, it holds grit/dirt, which scores the tenon and socket. I used to do it, but there are definite marks/damage on my tenor. And our sax techs both advise against it.
I'm talking the smallest bit here not a massive finger full, works on my saxes without scoring the bore, in perticular on my Silversonic which has a very tight double socket neck.....each to there own i guess...
 
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