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Happenings at my work bench.

Figaro

New Member
Messages
12
Back at the workbench for the first time since mid-August. I'm working on a 1917 HN White King baritone saxophone that I picked up from a music shop that closed down in New Orleans. This thing was pretty warped on the body and has a lot of little things that need to be reaired. Today's triumph was resoldering this tone hole chimney and it came out great.
I used TIX solder for the first time and I like it.
IMG_20201108_120010078.jpg
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
8,105
Nice work. Tix has been my "go to" solder ever since I learned about it. A useful trick I learned from another tech to prevent using too much solder when soldering guard feet, braces, etc. is to cut a short piece of solder and lay it next to one side of the part being soldered. Then heat is directed at the opposite side which draws the solder under the part to the heated side. I put the flux in the smallest needle tip applicator I can find to avoid applying more than is needed.
 

saxyjt

Saxus Circus Maximus
Subscriber
Messages
4,295
Soldering is my weak spot! I will need to address it. I have an old beaten Russian sax I bought just for that! But I still need to buy the right soldering equipment. My last attempts at soldering water pipes were not very successful. The very last one was even a complete failure! I went to buy some PVC pipes and adpators to finish the job! :oops:

I have a couple of horns that need some small soldering jobs for guard support or a body to bell support. But I just can't do them!
 

Figaro

New Member
Messages
12
Soldering is my weak spot! I will need to address it. I have an old beaten Russian sax I bought just for that! But I still need to buy the right soldering equipment. My last attempts at soldering water pipes were not very successful. The very last one was even a complete failure! I went to buy some PVC pipes and adpators to finish the job! :oops:

I have a couple of horns that need some small soldering jobs for guard support or a body to bell support. But I just can't do them!
I've taught quite a few folks to solder in various ways. The main thing to remember is that the solder will follow the heat and don't over heat the base metal. It needs to be hot enough to melt the solder and no more.
 

Figaro

New Member
Messages
12
Straigntened out this key guard this afternoon and soldered it with TIX. I pounded some pieces of solder flat and placed them under the feet of the guard along with flux and some red ochre to guard against solder bonding to areas I didn't want it to. I have a video of this whole thing in the works for my YouTube channel.

Before:
IMG_20200808_180905630.jpg


After straightening, dent removal and re-solder:
IMG_20201108_135131850.jpg
 

PigSquealer

Connoisseur of applesauce
Subscriber
Messages
134
Nice clean work. I always get nervous about soldering around toneholes even with a wet rag around it. I need to try the TIX.
How did the neck area come out ?
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
8,105
I sometimes get mixed results when trying to "sweat solder". I suspect that is because the parts are sometimes not fit well enough leaving gaps. A tip I learned from my mentor is to use a sharp thick needle to score around the edge of the soldered part in order to get a cleaner, more professional look. My first assignment as an apprentice was to make a few of these "pig stickers" as he called them. Thicker springs for scraping and scoring and thinner springs to hold corks, felts, and small pads. Music stores always have lots of used and broken drumsticks laying around.

1604869400464.jpeg
 

PigSquealer

Connoisseur of applesauce
Subscriber
Messages
134
Uploaded Part 1 of the work on this saxophone.

Great job on getting the bend out. Having everything straight and aligned reduces other issues down the line.
That neck area is definitely a bugger. You got lucky pulling that big dent out. I was waiting to see if it would tear a hole. Good job !
Worst case scenario you take the whole elbow and everything apart. Potentially another big can of worms. Call it patina and have a nice day is sometimes the best choice.
I wonder if the rats nest that was causing some tuning issues:w00t:
Looking forward to your ongoing overhaul on the doctor.

PS thanks for the GAS. Now I need a baritone.
 

PigSquealer

Connoisseur of applesauce
Subscriber
Messages
134
Nice go with the TIX. I’ll definitely be looking into some of that product. Good fixing of tone hole and wire guard.
I’m curious what the pH of your electrolyte solution is. Pearls do not like acidic solutions. What pH below 7.0 I do not know.
Black oxide is a real PIA. Sometimes four or five applications to get one clean. The Hagerty‘s foam works good. Wetter or dryer depends on the task. I’ve had equal luck with leaving a dry light film on. Then buffing with a soft clean cloth. Either way it’s lots of elbow grease.
keys look loads better. Although I don’t believe I ever saw the complete doctor before pictures.
Nice Covid hair ;) ...well at least you still have some:doh:
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,107
I was taught to straighten sax bodies with the keywork on, so any misaligned posts would go back in their original position without much extra work. It also prevents the bend going in the opposite direction.
It also helps to 'smooth out' the force applied - which would otherwise tend to gravitate to the tonehole nearest the fulcrum point.
A classic example of a horn body (top section) that's been 'straightened' without the keys on is a crease underneath the side C tonehole.
Not that it can't be done...but it raises the risk of collateral damage exponentially - and in severe cases the body tube can fold up.
 

Figaro

New Member
Messages
12
Productive afternoon in the work shop today. Straightened out all key work which was in surprisingly good condition. Key cups were mostly very flat. Installed everything to check alignment of key cups to tone holes and it all looks good after some minor adjustments.

Now it all comes back apart noting areas that need regulating cork. Next step is to get all tone holes level. As bent as this horn was I opted to test fit everything first and NOT level the tone holes just in case I had to do any adjustments to the body, which would inherently distort the tone holes.



IMG_20201127_141500588.jpg



IMG_20201127_144945058.jpg
 

PigSquealer

Connoisseur of applesauce
Subscriber
Messages
134
Looking good. I see you went with the white pads. Rivets ? If I were doing white pads clear shellac would be my choice.

Anyone build a DIY bench stand for bari. It just seems awkward having it laying on the bench. Especially with the neck facing down.
 

Figaro

New Member
Messages
12
Yep white pads with clear shellac. I ordered the pads from Music Medic without rivets thinking they would just be blank like the originals BUT they came with a hole punched in the center. I suppose I could send them all back and place a phone order for the same set without the hole and they would oblige.

Instead I'm going to install a rivet in them. I was going to just stitch them with a loop of thread in the center the same as the originals just to get as close as possible to the original tone. One little rivet is close enough. :)
 
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