Beginner Guitar Chords and Sax chords.

selkie

Senior Member
Messages
71
Locality
Scottish Borders
Having a bit of a mental block. Would appreciate some help. A guitar player is using D,G,A.E as chords for his songs and I should be changing these chords so I can play along. Ie D F# A on guitar for D chord. would I play an E chord? I need not to play the tune but improvise on his chords. But the guitar chord isn't same note sounds as mine. (Bb Soprano Sax.)I might not be explaining this well, sorry.
 
Your soprano is a Bb instrument. When you play C it sounds Bb. To play anything written for a C or non transposing instrument on any Bb instrument play a tone up.
 
Yes correct. You play a tone ie 2 semitones above concert pitch, with the Sop.
It may be better to think about why. The sop is pitched in Bb. Which means, when you play C it sound Bb,
 
PS. I hope you are changing Back to your human form, when you transpose. Being a Selkie an all.;)
 
Your soprano is a Bb instrument. When you play C it sounds Bb. To play anything written for a C or non transposing instrument on any Bb instrument play a tone up.

I understand that but having problems sorting out how I work out which chord matches to the sax one tone up from the guitar. If a D guitar chord is played I should then be using the notes of the E chord, I think. But is the E chord EGB or does it change to minor or something else? I sounded flat when I tried playing it.
 
I understand that but having problems sorting out how I work out which chord matches to the sax one tone up from the guitar. If a D guitar chord is played I should then be using the notes of the E chord, I think. But is the E chord EGB or does it change to minor or something else? I sounded flat when I tried playing it.

Guitar plays Dmajor DF#A you play E major EG#B. More useful would be to noodle in the right key. If the piece is in Dmajor you noodle in Emajor.
 
Guitar plays Dmajor DF#A you play E major EG#B. More useful would be to noodle in the right key. If the piece is in Dmajor you noodle in Emajor.

It would be much easier for me if I could play in right key but the guitarist has special needs and mostly plays, D,G,A,and Em sometimes, so I have to fit in with him. I basically play the notes of his chord transposed either 3 or 4 notes according to time sig and jig it around a bit.
 
It would be much easier for me if I could play in right key but the guitarist has special needs and mostly plays, D,G,A,and Em sometimes, so I have to fit in with him. I basically play the notes of his chord transposed either 3 or 4 notes according to time sig and jig it around a bit.
So three chords to learn - E, A, B and sometimes F minor. Sounds easy, but for someone who can't even remember C major when he's playing, I'd be lost. Notes please!
 
I would suggest a scale approach. First memorize your E major scale (4#'s). Then practice the notes of that scale going up to the tone above the starting note (9th) and back down starting on E, F#, G#, A, B, and C#.

E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E F#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G#-F#-E
F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E-F# G#-F#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G#-F#
G#-A-B-C#-D#-E-F#-G# A-G#-F#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G# etc.

This will get all the notes under your fingers and in your ear that you will use improvising to all of the chords the guitar player typically plays. Just choose the notes that sound good to you. If a note doesn't sound good go quickly to its neighbor and it will sound like a passing tone. :)
 
Ah, the benefits of playing by ear! I hope you get it sorted Selkie, it's way over my head ;)
 
O
I would suggest a scale approach. First memorize your E major scale (4#'s). Then practice the notes of that scale going up to the tone above the starting note (9th) and back down starting on E, F#, G#, A, B, and C#.

E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E F#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G#-F#-E
F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E-F# G#-F#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G#-F#
G#-A-B-C#-D#-E-F#-G# A-G#-F#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G# etc.

This will get all the notes under your fingers and in your ear that you will use improvising to all of the chords the guitar player typically plays. Just choose the notes that sound good to you. If a note doesn't sound good go quickly to its neighbor and it will sound like a passing tone. :)
Or do what I do and play completely at random
 
The saxophone is quite easy to play in sharp keys. Key of E has four sharps. F# C# G# D#. F# is just a finger swap so no problem. C#is no fingers, easy enough. You can leave your pinky on the G# key and the saxophone will take care of the rest. The only thing to remember is to add your pinky to the D to sharpen it.

Hit the tonic of each chord and run to the tonic of the next chord till you get the feel of the piece. Try a descending blues scale. E D B Bb A G E. And remember, One long note can be moving. Tonguing a rhythm on one note is valid.


Count yourself lucky you're starting out on tenor. The alto plays with another flat. Amateur guitarists famously like sharp keys. " Blues in E" 2 3 4. C# on alto. Lots of long blue notes from the alto.

The more you play , the easier it gets. Practice and prepare.
 
It would be much easier for me if I could play in right key but the guitarist has special needs and mostly plays, D,G,A,and Em sometimes, so I have to fit in with him. I basically play the notes of his chord transposed either 3 or 4 notes according to time sig and jig it around a bit.
oh yeh most guitarists have special needs cos they only understand tab music and have trouble transposing.
 

Similar threads

Back
Top Bottom