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Strings Guitar Advice - for a beginner

stom

Member
Messages
59
My latest GAS attack last weekend ended up with my purchasing an archtop guitar...... I've been wanting learn a chordal instrument to better my music theory knowledge - which will hopefully improve my sax playing long term...? The guitar appealed more than the piano.

To any guitar players on the forum do you have any advice on how to approach learning the instrument? At the moment the fretboard is very confusing. Whats the best way to learning the instrument? a a second instrument should I be looking at getting regular lessons or will a few to get me started be enough?

Any advice will be gratefully received.

Tom
 

ellinas

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,110
Locality
Athens, Greece
I have good news for you. The fretboard is easier than you think.
First things first. Get a tuner and learn how to tune a guitar.

Second SETUP your new guitar. Which means have it set up by someone who knows.

You are lucky that in 2014 there are resources like Justinguitar.com for free.

Now a small intro. The 6 string guitar has the following notes on the strings. From downside up : E A D G B E.
each fret on the same string has one semitone distance from the one before and an open string is one semitone before fret 1.

So if you want to play F for example press on the 6th string the first fret - this is the upper string. Strum it and kaboom an f. If you press the 2nd fret there's f# etc.

Thats just to demystify the fretboard :)

I play guitar the almost all my life. Should you need any help knock my door.
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,540
Locality
The Palm Tree strewn Wandle Surf Beach under the o
Sorry to be a PITA but wouldn't a cheap electronic keyboard be more suitable?

You can see the relationship of the notes in a chord, whereas that is not so obvious on a guitar as they are either taught by chord shapes or single note. No, I don't want to buy it as I already own one as well as a reasonable banjo, which is at least open tuned to a chord.
 

Chris

Well Known
Café Supporter
Messages
3,826
Locality
Manchester,England
+1 to what OG said:thumb:. Man, I must be getting old to agree with OG:w00t:

Chris..
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
Messages
2,770
Locality
Ilkley West Yorkshire
Hi Tom,
Archtop guitar so you must be hoping to learn to play jazz I assume.
There are loads of postings on YOUTUBE to get you going but if you want to learn the rudiments of progressions used in Jazz
I can recommend "Chord progressions in Jazz and Popular Guitar" by Arnie Herle, available on Amazon etc.
It teaches in a very accessible way chord progressions, chord voicings, etc. Quite an old book but still very relevant.
But if you want to play rockabilly you need a quiff.

Good luck and if you need help pm me.

Andy
 

stom

Member
Messages
59
Andy, Colin Ellinas thanks for your words of encouragement. I've ordered Bert Weedon's & Arnie Herle's books. I'll see how I go on with them. I think I will try and find a tutor to get a few lessons to at least get me grounded in the basics.

Andy you are quite right - I am very interested in attempting to learn Jazz-style guitar, I've also been told by a clasical guitar playing friend that it's one of the most difficult styles to become accomplished at.....

Old Git, Chris, I completely agree with you that a keyboard/piano would give me a better grounding in theory. We actually have a piano in the house which I occasionally attempt to play(my girlfriends been playing for years) however its not an instrument that I feel inspired to throw myself into - the guitar appeals much more in this way.
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
Messages
2,770
Locality
Ilkley West Yorkshire
It's a good idea to get a tutor Tom. If you're interested in chord solos the position of your left (fretting hand) is so important.
Get it wrong and you can do some serious damage to your shoulder/elbow/wrist as some members on here can attest.
Good luck at mastering the technique. I've been at it since I was seven and fifty two years on can only now say I've taken the
"L Plates" off. Still lots to learn.
 

zelda

On the border
Messages
547
Locality
British Columbia interior, Canada
Sorry to be a PITA but wouldn't a cheap electronic keyboard be more suitable?

You can see the relationship of the notes in a chord, whereas that is not so obvious on a guitar as they are either taught by chord shapes or single note. No, I don't want to buy it as I already own one as well as a reasonable banjo, which is at least open tuned to a chord.

I agree. Having been a guitar player for over fifty years, my advice to anyone who asks me about learning to play the guitar goes something like this: "Buy a keyboard AND a guitar. Start taking piano lessons."
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,540
Locality
The Palm Tree strewn Wandle Surf Beach under the o
Tom,
Was not suggesting that you play keyboard but it is indicative of note relationship in chords and remains so in inversions and easier to carry out initial experiments. As notes are available on any of the six strings on a guitar, this makes chord construction less simple. Therefore for starters, grab the bird's joanna for a look see.

Go for it Tom but please no POWER CHORDS!>:)>:)>:)
 

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,871
Locality
Costa Blanca Spain
Played guitar now for 52 years, but didn't learn a jot about music structures till I got my head stuck in a saxophone. Improved my guitar no end. When I got a keyboard I could actually see the stuff before me very eyes. Hope you get what you want from it. Learning it same as anything. Learn where most of the notes are in the easiest places, learn the simplest chords, play a few things and then some more and get better and better. Learn no bad habits and then get some technique. It all snowballs. My opinion, good lessons always always help, specially with avoiding bad wicked evil habits that will hinder you in later days.
Cheers
Mike
 

Clivey

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,257
Locality
Edinburgh/Hot Rock off African Coast
What is an archtop guitar?

heres mine. I mught sell it very soon



x155.JPG
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
Messages
2,770
Locality
Ilkley West Yorkshire
I play the De Armond Starfire, with the double cutaway, same pickups. I love it Clivey.
 

MBGT

New Member
Messages
21
Get yourself some guitar lessons.... invaluable!! 'The Registry of Guitar Teachers' (RGT) should link you up with someone in your area. Check their listings and pick someone who sounds like they are on the same wavelength... (the quality of guitar teaching in particular varies MASSIVELY!). A good teacher will have a good web presence and have lots of positive testimonials from satisfied pupils. Their 'shop window', if presented well, should enable you to make a good informed choice.

Get your technique pretty good from the off (hand positions, holding, picking technique etc) and be patient. Remember 'practice makes permanent', not necessarily 'perfect'!! - bad habits have to be unlearned if you are not careful. Your rate of progress will be rapid at first with consciencious regular practice... (and a good guiding hand). Already being a musician will help massively

Have fun!
 

Jane M L

Member
Messages
265
Locality
Newcastle Emlyn, Ceredigion
www.freeguitarvideos.com has short free lessons about once per week from 1/2 dozen very good teachers/players. That's few minutes video + tablature.
Guy Fenocchi is the main jazz man there and as well as the free short lessons does download long lessons with 5 or so jazz lines that illustrate some esoteric jazz tricks that are really fun to labour thru at any age. Cost $5 approx - you can't go wrong.
Jody Worrell does some neat country lessons and country guitar fits any budding guitarists who wants to get a good technique.
Above all LEARN TABLATURE from these simple lessons, and then learn dots later.
I agree with jeremyjuicewah that learning sax has made learning dots so much easier than the subtle complications of the guitar. But it's the almost infinite number of chord shapes and tunings that add up to infinity + voiceings that are some of the benefits of those guitar complications.

Jaime Andreas is very good on the physical strains of guitar playing and has masses of anatomical knowledge to illustrate how to avoid RSI - guitarprinciples.com. Very positive attitude.
 

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