M/Pieces - Ligs Green Hard Rubber mouthpiece

BigDoug

Member
Messages
52
Location
Newcastle upon Tyne
I have an oldish hard rubber Otto Link Tone Edge 6* which is now virtually olive green. Does anyone have any magical tricks to enable me to restore it to its former black ? It still plays well, but looks a bit weird.
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
550
Location
France
If its not too far gone a coat of mineral oil or if you dont have that some olive oil will make it blacker...but not jet black.

Dont use veggie oil, it can start to smell

apply with cloth or paper towel, If it sucks it up after 10 minutes you can apply again.

Wipe it down and play.

If you wash it with soap and water it will likely reverse this process.
 

hedgehog

I love singletrack.
Subscriber
Messages
158
Location
Minnesota, USA
If you wash it with soap and water it will likely reverse this process.
I think you mean washing with soap and water will make it go greenish again. Have I got that right?

I seem to recall hearing sunlight tends to make the ebonite go green. Is that true?

Thanks!
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
550
Location
France
Yes and Yes...especially direct sunlight.

Ive been told by babbitt that soaking a piece for a long time will do a better job of darkening the piece. I cant see that it would do any harm, but I have not tried it . (a long time being a couple of days).
 
OP
BigDoug

BigDoug

Member
Messages
52
Location
Newcastle upon Tyne
If its not too far gone a coat of mineral oil or if you dont have that some olive oil will make it blacker...but not jet black.

Dont use veggie oil, it can start to smell

apply with cloth or paper towel, If it sucks it up after 10 minutes you can apply again.

Wipe it down and play.

If you wash it with soap and water it will likely reverse this process.
I tried dousing it with WD40, which seems to have produced a reasonable result .......... not black, but “blacker”.
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
550
Location
France
Yes, not exactly good for you and Im not sure how it will react to hard rubber compounds. Stick with food grade materials.
 

GCinCT

Seeker of truth and beauty
Subscriber
Messages
995
Location
Oneonta, NY
Yes, not exactly good for you and Im not sure how it will react to hard rubber compounds. Stick with food grade materials.
It's not my material of choice, but I understand some people like ranch dressing. ;)
 

Keep Blowing

Senior Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
1,350
Location
Bottesford England
I have an oldish hard rubber Otto Link Tone Edge 6* which is now virtually olive green. Does anyone have any magical tricks to enable me to restore it to its former black ? It still plays well, but looks a bit weird.
If it's not over important on what happens to the appearance of your Mouthpiece try some wire wool, (the finest grade) or a very fine grit silicon carbide grade Emery type paper, around 7000 grit, but not on the table or rails.
 

Keep Blowing

Senior Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
1,350
Location
Bottesford England
If it's not over important on what happens to the appearance of your Mouthpiece try some wire wool, (the finest grade) or a very fine grit silicon carbide grade Emery type paper, around 7000 grit, but not on the table or rails.
I use the wire wool to polish copper, it's liberon 0000
 

hedgehog

I love singletrack.
Subscriber
Messages
158
Location
Minnesota, USA
It certainly looks nicer. That will have exposed new material to the air and sunlight. It'd be interesting to see what happens in a few weeks...will it start turning green?

Also...odor? Does it now have that sulfur odor?

It'd be great to have a mouthpiece as comfortable as hard rubber but without the color and odor issues. Maybe these new printed pieces will do that.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
12,575
Location
Lundy Island
I have found the main culprits are sunlight and warm water, so probably just getting quite warm will also do it)

I have always had good results with Olive Oil, I'd prefer that to any kind of synthetic or mineral oil.
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
6,957
Location
Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
I have successfully used Ferree's black buffing compound to restore the color and shine. Of course one has to avoid the side and tip rails when buffing.

I have communicated with Dr. Omar Henderson of Dr's Products who is a chemist as well as a musician on this topic. He said that the discoloration and smell is caused by sulfur being released by the ebonite as a result of oxidation. He also indicated that this chemical process can be reversed, but the process is too dangerous for an amateur to attempt. He said he could do this on mouthpieces for $50 each, but this was several years ago and the price may have gone up.
 

altissimo

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,296
Location
leicester
It'd be great to have a mouthpiece as comfortable as hard rubber but without the color and odor issues
there are several mouthpiece makers like Ponzol, Jody Jazz, Drake, Lamberson and SR Tech who use other materials for some of their products eg Resin, Acetal, Delrin, Polycarbonate - but for some reason the saxophone industry is stuck in the past and hard rubber is still used because that's what they used for the vintage mouthpieces that are so fetishised these days..
It's funny that we're always told that it's the player who creates the sound and mouthpiece material makes no difference and yet so many people still make mouthpieces out of an archaic polymer like vulcanised rubber.because it's got that special vintage sound...

While I prefer the feel of hard rubber mouthpieces, I wouldn't mind if they were all made of a durable plastic instead. Generally I have never liked the feel of metal mouthpieces in my mouth, but I recently dug out a stainless Berg and have been enjoying it, so I may be a convert to stainless - anyone got an SS Lawton BB alto piece they want rid of? Or an ARB?

Personally I don't care if my old hard rubber mouthpieces aren't perfectly black, the discolouration isn't too bad and they're made to be played, not admired for their beauty.
None of mine have the sulphur smell that is sometimes reported - maybe the amount of brimstone in my vicinity masks the sulphurous aroma...
The worst I have is an old 1920's C Melody mouthpiece that is turned nice coffee colour and a '40's/50's Berg Larsen Precision that is a very dark olive green/brown that looks like patinated bronze.

Exposure to combination of sunlight seems to have the worst effect, but any light will eventually cause some surface discolouration, although it can take decades
 
Top Bottom