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Gestalt! At Last!

Little Oaf

Member
Messages
44
As a 'newbie' to the world of sax playing I have read with envy the many posts by much more accomplished sax players, wishing that I too could one day offer some meaningful advice or at least gain the satisfaction from playing that many of you do.

Well having decided to heed the helpful hints here on the forum and a realisation that practice really is the only way to achieve my goal I now feel that I am getting somewhere!:welldone

Not up with the greats yet but suddenly things are falling into place! Gestalt!

So will continue follow the forum and one day you never know, I might have something useful to say lol!:)))
 

Saxlicker

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,933
Well having decided to heed the helpful hints here on the forum and a realisation that practice really is the only way to achieve my goal I now feel that I am getting somewhere!:welldone
Hi Little Oaf,
Glad to hear you are progressing OK.
Many members of this forum have been embarking on their journey in the last couple of years as well and I don't think anyone, no matter how long they have been at it ever forgets what it is like to begin with.

In the past people have posted about how to split up practise, so here comes an unrequested ;} tip......

The main thing is of course that you always enjoy it.
So splitting it up into portions where you learn something, persevere with something, revisit something and just noodle around are all as important as each other in their own way but setting aside time for each bit is up to you to find the right level that will keep you interested on that particular day.
But always try to digest a bit of theory per day
(that way you shouldn't have to revisit some basic chord & scale structures like I am after 23 years at it!!! :mad::mad:).
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
As someone once said...."I've read so much about all the skills, techniques, alternative fingerings, breath control, embouchure development and equipment choice involved in learning/playing the sax well, ..........that I've decided to give up reading......."

Practice is great but does require a degree of motivation and sense of purpose.
 

Little Oaf

Member
Messages
44
Hi Little Oaf,

In the past people have posted about how to split up practise, so here comes an unrequested ;} tip......
.
Thanks all helpful unrequested tips welcome! Will incorporate split practice, who knows sometime soon may even be able to 'noodle' around!
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
I think the art of enjoying practice is to work on something with a specific goal in mind. Maybe it's just a smooth transition from C to D (harder than it sounds) or just to get a decent low C... The exercises in my study boko are oftentedious - until I reliase what it's trying to teach, then working on it concetrating on the learning points gives a great sense of achievement. If something's to ticky at the moment, leave it for a week or two and come back to it. But don't use that as an excuse for not mastering a point...

Makes my day when my wife says 'xyz is sounding a lot better' or 'I can hear you're working on that, and it's getting there' or even better, 'I think you're ready for me to accompany you on that piece'

So small steps, clear (achievable) goals and lots of satisfaction.
 

Greywolf

Member
Messages
59
My unsolicited 6 pennorth, for what it's worth (assuming of course that you are not already) is too start playing with other people ASAP. If you don't already then the chances are that if you are nervous about it you will put it off longer than you should and you will gain so much from it. Playing / practising on your own can be very sterile. Music is something which really has to be shared and you learn so much from playing with other people and it gives your practice sessions a good deal more focus and purpose.

If you're not playing with others, and you don't think your ready then start to scope out amateur rehearsal bands, street bands, other like minded musicians. Look on the walls of music shops for groups looking for members, ask around etc. etc. Local arts centres, jam sessions. Even in relatively small towns there is a whole underworld and subculture of music.
 

Little Oaf

Member
Messages
44
Thanks Greywolf, funny you should mention playing with others. As a beginner would not have thought of playing with someone else however: whilst out with my other half having a quiet meal in our local the other night, we got chatting to an elderly gentleman my OH knows through business. Not to be rude, I listened intently has he spoke on various subjects - where is this going I hear you say!

Well turned out he has been playing sax for the last 5 or so years; well after we had almost exhausted the subject (and my other half talking about it) he went off to his boat (canalside pub) and brought back numerous music books to give to me! Next thing I know we are agreeing that we will meet up to play together and duet!

So I plan on practising a little harder and now have my 'motivation' 'goal' and 'purpose' as previously quoted on this thread.

Watch this space!
 

Sunray

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,708
Don't work too hard ...

Hey Little Oaf ...

Just go for the fun and experience of it ... Brush shoulders and feel the magic of the shared musical experience ...


Next time and the one after ... you may wanna do some work ... But for now - Just go and enjoy the feeling of being part of the bigger picture [sharing and learning together] ...

PS - nice to see you back posting ... ;}

PPS - It sounds like he has much to give and wants to share with you ... That's really nice ...
 

Little Oaf

Member
Messages
44
Hey Little Oaf ...

PPS - It sounds like he has much to give and wants to share with you ... That's really nice ...
Yes Sunray I think we will both benefit from our serendipitous meeting :)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Justin Chune

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,011
Duets are great fun and I'm sure you will enjoy playing them. Next time you are in a music store check out James Rae's " Easy Jazzy Duets " you might like them. I second the advice to get into a community band asap. Don't ever worry about playing with people who are far better than you are, you won't hold them back :)

Jim.
 

Little Oaf

Member
Messages
44
Hi Jim, just got to read your post, thanks for the advice and encouragement, will look out for the duet suggestion too.

Have been away for the weekend and actually found myself missing playing!

Amanda
 

Greywolf

Member
Messages
59
Great news Little Oaf. What Justin said is true you won't hold better players back, but playing with better players will bring you on. Another point about playing with others which you just don't do when playing/ practising on your own is to play through your errors.

When practising, there is a tendency to stop when you make an error and play it again. This is like the curate's egg - good in parts. Better to play slower and get it right. When you are playing in an ensemble you WILL make mistakes but you cannot stop to correct it you have to let it go and keep playing and the longer you spend revisiting your errors the more difficult it can be to get out of the habit.

Having been a visual performer in the past (juggling etc) I notice a big difference between audiences' different perceptions of visual and auditory errors.

If you make a visual error (drop a club or a ball, the audience WILL remember it.

Make an error while playing and half the audience won't even notice it let alone remember it. Most of the band probably won't even notice it either!

And remember the the age old advice, if you make a mistake, play it again to show that you really meant it.
 

Little Oaf

Member
Messages
44
Having been a visual performer in the past (juggling etc) I notice a big difference between audiences' different perceptions of visual and auditory errors.

I know what you mean about audiences; I used to belong to a musical society, lots of singing and dancing, we often came off stage bemoaning a missed cue, step or line but usually found audiences were none the wiser!

Again thanks for the encouraging advice

Amanda
 

thehunt

Member
Messages
785
Hi Amanda, my wifes said when i started it was toot, toot, toot, breath toot, now its ( three years later ) Toooottt, Toooot, much smoother. Well that is what she says !!..
I am sure you will go through stages of learning like we all are and do. I made a concious decision about two years ago to really work on my tone and breath control. People say i sound a lot better. I would also wholeheartedly advise and encourage to join some sort of band etc if poss as then your progress just goes through the roof, even without you realising it.
Keep at it. All the best Phil
 
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