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G with Octave key problem - Tech advice needed!

Alexandra

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Hi

I have a week-old problem playing a G with octave key on my Yany AWO10. The body octave often doesn't open, just the neck octave (underslung). The problem is intermittent or I would counter it by overblowing a high G.

When the body octave key does open, it makes a tacky sound as the pads separate, and causes a delayed octave jump or a mess of a sound. Would a bit of fine-grain sandpaper passed through the pads possibly help? Or is this likely a mechanical fault? Any advice much appreciated!

(FYI The Yany is a new-ish replacement, less than a year old. No other mechanical issues with it).

Alex
 

Stephen Howard

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If it continues to be a problem, and repeated applications of cigarette light fluid doesn't fix it, you can have the pad replaced with a cork one - at which point it would be worth inspecting the octave key pip for burrs. Not likely to be an issue on a Yani, but everyone makes mistakes.
 

jbtsax

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To apply naptha (lighter fluid) to a pad I like to use a "cotton bud" (Q-Tip) used for applying cosmetics that has one end flattened. If that is not available one end can be flattened using smooth jaw pliers. I rub the pad with a liberal amount of fluid followed by wiping with a dry cotton bud.

On regular toneholes I sometimes also pull a strip of 1000 grit wet or dry paper between the pad and tonehole using light pressure 2 or 3 times with the abrasive side down. This both cleans and smooths the top of the tonehole. I would not do this on the top of an octave pip.
 
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Alexandra

Alexandra

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@jbtsax Thank you so much for the detailed info. I've ordered some lighter fluid that should be here tomorrow and I've got cotton buds.

I knew I'd heard of using sandpaper on pads somewhere before and wondered if a fine grit, car-polish sandpaper would work.

But I'll just use the lighter fluid as you and @Stephen Howard have advised. :thumb:
 

Stephen Howard

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I knew I'd heard of using sandpaper on pads somewhere before and wondered if a fine grit, car-polish sandpaper would work.

But I'll just use the lighter fluid as you and @Stephen Howard have advised. :thumb:
You might find it hard to get a standard cotton bud between the body octave key pad and the pip - which is why I recommend pipe cleaners. They're cheaper, and you can clean more pads with them before you have to throw the things away.
But you can also use a piece of cotton sheet - such as the corner of a handkerchief. Even a strip of thick paper will do the job...and won't fall apart too quickly when soaked with lighter fluid.

Fine sandpaper (or carborundum paper, for preference - which is likely to be used for car paint work ) can be used to remove gunk from tonehole rims - but on something with as small a surface area of an octave key pip you really do need to take a bit more care...and as your horn is less than a year old you need to be mindful of the warranty conditions. If the horn develops a serious problem, many manufacturers will take a dim view of any evidence of 'abuse'.
 

saxmad

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I might have missed the point here but Alexandra is saying the "body Octave" doesn't open when playing "G with the octave key" - I'm guessing she means the 2nd octave key isn't opening when playing G (that sits on the top of the stave). Well it shouldn't be opening until playing the A above it.
 

GCinCT

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I might have missed the point here but Alexandra is saying the "body Octave" doesn't open when playing "G with the octave key" - I'm guessing she means the 2nd octave key isn't opening when playing G (that sits on the top of the stave). Well it shouldn't be opening until playing the A above it.
I think she means exactly what she said. The body octave key which sits at the top of the body and opens from Ab down to D. The other octave key is the neck or crook octave key which opens from A up.
 
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