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Four octave scales

Chas

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95
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England
Hello there, does anybody know of any books what prints scales from bottom b to top altisimo c and the scales go up in the middle then come back down in a pyramid shape,yours faithfully Charlie charlesworth
 

scotsman

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365
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none
Just google sax altissimo. Look at any sax music and look for the _Ve sign over the notes.. Four octaves would have a lot of lines under the note BTW!!!!.. Regards
 

MandyH

Sax-Mad fiend!
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The Malverns, Worcs
Write your own using Sibelius or Musescore??
 

jbtsax

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For ease of reading when notes go beyond 3 or 4 ledger lines above the staff they are often written an octave lower than they sound with 8va written above. For notes below the bass clef staff they are written an octave higher with 8va bassa or 8vb written below. @tenorviol is the expert on these types of things since he plays cello.
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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Minster On Sea
I'm not sure why you'd want them printed. If you can play 4 octaves on a sax then surely you know all your scales back to front.
I can manage 4 on a bari but not on any of the others. 4 on a sop would be something. :clapping:
 

spike

Old Indian
Messages
2,251
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Half way up a hill
Well when I was a young lad in the sixties and still learning to play this infernal tube with knobs on.
Me and my mate would meet up on Wednesday afternoons in his basement and the only book we had to practice from was a Victorian or very old practice book for piano. It contained melodic and harmonic scale excersises. That was all we had so we'd start the exercises at the lowest note on the saxophone and play up to the highest note that we could.
There wasn't a lot've altissimo knockin' about in those days. Charlie didn't do it, and Ornette squeaked a bit evry now and we didn't need it in the R&B and R&R bands that we played with then so we didn't bovver wiv it.
The exercises were quite pyramidic in shape but we cut 'em off top and bottom to fit.
We'd do that once a week for a couple of hours and after we'd nip off darn the pub and talk about be-bop and stuff.
I was going to suggest Nicolas Slominsky but I just noticed that although he doesn't specifically do 4 octaves in his book he does do five octaves in 6 parts and 3 octaves in 4 parts.
It is however often pyramidical and he does infra-ultrapolation, and septitone progressions over seven octaves as well as palindromic canons.
I was a rock'n'roll nutcase in the late 90's and went through a phase of doin' this stuff for hours on end on a daily basis.
On the back cover of the Slominsky - "Thesarus of scales and melodic patterns" - if I may quote -
" . . . The Thesarus is a monumental compilation of unfamiliar melodic patterns; it is a precious reference book for advanced pianists in developing a superior technique . . . "
These days I still suffer from insomnia but I don't shake as much as I used to to.
 
OP
C

Chas

Member
Messages
95
Locality
England
I'm not sure why you'd want them printed. If you can play 4 octaves on a sax then surely you know all your scales back to front.
I can manage 4 on a bari but not on any of the others. 4 on a sop would be something. :clapping:
Hi nick thanks for getting back about octaves you said if I can play four octaves which I can,that I should know all the scales? I know the alphabet from a to z but I cant spell all words cheers charlie
 

Jeanette

Organizress
Cafe Moderator
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25,879
Locality
Cheshire UK
Hi nick thanks for getting back about octaves you said if I can play four octaves which I can,that I should know all the scales? I know the alphabet from a to z but I cant spell all words cheers charlie
To learn a scale you don't need four octaves :)

Jx
 
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C

Chas

Member
Messages
95
Locality
England
Well when I was a young lad in the sixties and still learning to play this infernal tube with knobs on.
Me and my mate would meet up on Wednesday
Well when I was a young lad in the sixties and still learning to play this infernal tube with knobs on.
Me and my mate would meet up on Wednesday afternoons in his basement and the only book we had to practice from was a Victorian or very old practice book for piano. It contained melodic and harmonic scale excersises. That was all we had so we'd start the exercises at the lowest note on the saxophone and play up to the highest note that we could.
There wasn't a lot've altissimo knockin' about in those days. Charlie didn't do it, and Ornette squeaked a bit evry now and we didn't need it in the R&B and R&R bands that we played with then so we didn't bovver wiv it.
The exercises were quite pyramidic in shape but we cut 'em off top and bottom to fit.
We'd do that once a week for a couple of hours and after we'd nip off darn the pub and talk about be-bop and stuff.
I was going to suggest Nicolas Slominsky but I just noticed that although he doesn't specifically do 4 octaves in his book he does do five octaves in 6 parts and 3 octaves in 4 parts.
It is however often pyramidical and he does infra-ultrapolation, and septitone progressions over seven octaves as well as palindromic canons.
I was a rock'n'roll nutcase in the late 90's and went through a phase of doin' this stuff for hours on end on a daily basis.
On the back cover of the Slominsky - "Thesarus of scales and melodic patterns" - if I may quote -
" . . . The Thesarus is a monumental compilation of unfamiliar melodic patterns; it is a precious reference book for advanced pianists in developing a superior technique . . . "
These days I still suffer from insomnia but I don't shake as much as I used to to.
Cses at the lowest note on the saxophone and play up to the highest note that we could.
There wasn't a lot've altissimo knockin' about in those days. Charlie didn't do it, and Ornette squeaked a bit evry now and we didn't need it in the R&B and R&R bands that we played with then so we didn't bovver wiv it.
The exercises were quite pyramidic in shape but we cut 'em off top and bottom to fit.
We'd do that once a week for a couple of hours and after we'd nip off darn the pub and talk about be-bop and stuff.
I was going to suggest Nicolas Slominsky but I just noticed that although he doesn't specifically do 4 octaves in his book he does do five octaves in 6 parts and 3 octaves in 4 parts.
It is however often pyramidical and he does infra-ultrapolation, and septitone progressions over seven octaves as well as palindromic canons.
I was a rock'n'roll nutcase in the late 90's and went through a phase of doin' this stuff for hours on end on a daily basis.
On the back cover of the Slominsky - "Thesarus of scales and melodic patterns" - if I may quote -
" . . . The Thesarus is a monumental compilation of unfamiliar melodic patterns; it is a precious reference book for advanced pianists in developing a superior technique . . . "
These days I still suffer from insomnia but I don't shake as much as I used to to.
 
OP
C

Chas

Member
Messages
95
Locality
England
Cheers spike that was a great answer to my question nice one charlie
 
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C

Chas

Member
Messages
95
Locality
England
To learn a scale you don't need four octaves :)

Jx
If your going into the altismo register
Hi nick thanks for getting back about octaves you said if I can play four octaves which I can,that I should know all the scales? I know the alphabet from a to z but I cant spell all words cheers charlie
 
OP
C

Chas

Member
Messages
95
Locality
England
You do if your playing altismo say from low c up into altismo top c that's four octaves or at least I thought it was I may be wrong
 

Halfers

Finger Flapper
Subscriber
Messages
2,100
Locality
Hampshire
C,D,E,F,G,A,B
C,D,E,F,G,A,B
C,D,E,F,G,A,B
C,D,E,F,G,A,B

C Major in 4 Octaves :)
 
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C

Chas

Member
Messages
95
Locality
England
Your quite right ,and the fingering does change your quite right again, but the original question was reading the scales for four octaves the notes dont change but the dots do,
 

Halfers

Finger Flapper
Subscriber
Messages
2,100
Locality
Hampshire
Your quite right ,and the fingering does change your quite right again, but the original question was reading the scales for four octaves the notes dont change but the dots do,
Right, so is it practice in reading the notes above and below the stave that you're after? That makes sense. @jbtsax gives some guidance on this in comment No 5
 
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