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Filthy Habits (re-recorded)

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
I re-recorded this tune. All my sax work is purely experimental. I'm not very structured
as well as very undisciplined, per se. In that element I always try and find something that's odd in that experimenting mode. It's such a precarious endeavor to try and do that. I have years of structure and discipline yelling at me when I play and I try and fight it as I'm playing. Which is why I tend to stop playing because I don't want to just blow notes that everyone is accustomed to which makes me bored. In this attempt there are areas I like harmonically where I went because of trying to fight the accustomed thinking process. But I must admit half the time I feel brain dead while doing it!




Filthy Habits
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_music.cfm?bandID=1289603
 

Clivey

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,168
Location
Edinburgh/Hot Rock off African Coast
Where my family come from and I don`t mean Scotland but specifically North East Buckie. this is the type of folk music that is passed down in Verbal tradition and has been for generation after generation.
There should be others if you are interested.

Heres a good one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ydUfCGZ3Qo

If you dig deep and research " diddliing " and "bothy ballads" "lilting" you can begin to identify a lot of the the pattern structures that have helped to denote and construct Jazz music. There has been a controversial thread over at the other place running for years more or less along these lines but unfortunately the OP "rather stupidly in my opinion" did not bother to back up his theory with any examples or for that matter defend the allegations that were fired at him more or less accusing him of discrediting and disproportioning the African American pioneers of what Ellington Called " American Music " and specifically that it was of African origin.but stemmed from a European heritage . He also cited Buckie /Buchan music.
So what has this got to do with your updated version? I can hear the restraint Mike and I myself try to at least ration certain techniques as I often shudder when I hear gross overuse of " diddling cliches" that I grew up with and that for me purely represent local folk music of the simplest ( some might say beautiful) form but which are also the easiest and most employed method of facilatiing a note shift from one part of a scale to another. especially when played on a "pipe like" instrument or sung.
LOL I suppose next for me will be when the chromatic run becomes so unbearable to play and hear within the discussed genre. Then it will be truly time to go back to playing quarter or even half note at a time rather than to have produce the irritating cliches ( Or maybe Playing Drums or Congas ) Thats the true primitive wherever on the planet your genes are from. So Mike I hear what you are trying and to a point you are getting it . I was however wowed by quite a few passages on the first version that I`m sure I would be capable of producing but that at this stage would not be able to employ as skillfully as you did on that first version and for that reason I think as an entertainment the first one had it for me although I do like the second take and particularly enjoyed the last few bars.
 
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Kath

Member
Messages
119
Location
South Wales
I'm a real novice - but sometimes I think the familiar and safe, played with immense emotion, can be worth a lot . . . . I'm a bit like you though - don't want to do something anyone else has already done. What's the point! But remember what you had to learn as a beginner - you have to learn the rules to know which ones to break and when - which suggests sometimes you need to keep the traditional. Sorry - probably not much help at all - like I said, I am a real novice, only been playing for 2 months - but that's my thoughts anyway :) Besides Mike, brain dead's good!
 

Jamesmac

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,872
Great Tenor sound, concise clean, i could listen to this music in any situation, listening intently, how you develop and build on the phrases, or just while im talking with friends or cooking.
Thanks for posting.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
Hi Clivey,
I find the video very interesting. I'm not very familiar with this type of vocals
but I do find it very rhythmic. Possibly in a peripheral sense I've heard them because to a certain extent they sound familiar, rhytmically speaking. If the inflections were altered just a bit it could very easily be supllemented into jazz.
Yes, restraint is a good word. I'm more involved in thinking than execution which explains a lot of the silences. Silences are good for any piece of music, but those silences are strategic in order for me to think a little down the road. I'm not 100% sure of myself when I play and so there has to be elements of restraint. In the 1st rendition you liked, there's restraint in that as well. Maybe it's not noticelable to any one listener but everything I play has restraint in it because i cannot go the distance. I've never put the time in for that type of innovation.


Nothing wrong with cliches, per se. But what I find essential is to be able to distort them which I've done here and there on the new recording. I have to hear the cliche and sort of make fun of it, or create a cariacture of it. That's how I could get beyond it. However, cliches in their own right have a purpose of balance within the distortion, which is the road I try to take.


Thank you Clivey, I really enjoyed the information you've supplied in your post!
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
I'm a real novice - but sometimes I think the familiar and safe, played with immense emotion, can be worth a lot . . . . I'm a bit like you though - don't want to do something anyone else has already done. What's the point! But remember what you had to learn as a beginner - you have to learn the rules to know which ones to break and when - which suggests sometimes you need to keep the traditional. Sorry - probably not much help at all - like I said, I am a real novice, only been playing for 2 months - but that's my thoughts anyway :) Besides Mike, brain dead's good!

Yes, I can't dispute that. Emotion is emotion and that's a personal thing and if anyone else picks up on that emotion in their own way, well, that's a good thing.
True, I don't see a point for myself to do what's already been accomplished. If others enjoy that then they should continue with it just as long as it brings them pleasure.


Well, I don't believe there's rules to begin with. Others have stated that there are rules. That's only illusion at work. So, I don't try to break the rules merely because they aren't there. I just try and find a way that I can find intrigue.


Ha, in the tradtional sense I've been brain dead for many decades.


A rule I've always instilled in my kids, when they were children, is to always question everything. Just because a teacher tells you something, if instinct tells you different and it's a gut feeling, trust your instinct and not necessarily the teacher's point of view.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
Great Tenor sound, concise clean, i could listen to this music in any situation, listening intently, how you develop and build on the phrases, or just while im talking with friends or cooking.
Thanks for posting.

Thanks.....Building up of phrases is getting a general idea of a phrase and try to modify or distort it. A note here, a note there...And so on.
Which actually isn't my strong suit but I've been leaning in that direction when I play around the house.


Your welcome!
 

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