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Facial surgery

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
Wasn't sure which forum to put this thread in.

I found out today I need a superficial parotidectomy to remove a (so-far benign) lump from the corner of my jaw. Apparently there's a small(ish) chance of damage to the facial nerve. I'm a bit scared this may affect (or knacker?) my sax playing. Does anyone have any experience/knowledge/second-hand anecdotes which might help me?

Cheers

Martin
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,268
I haven't a clue what that is but i wish you a healthy and speedy recovery :)
 
Messages
181
I don't have any idea, but maybe extra 'embouchure' exercises will help tighten things up? :) I wish you all the best mate! :D
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
I think it's likely to stop you playing for a little while, but it's not a rare procedure and outcomes are usually good. I'd give you two pieces of advice.

1 DO NOT try to research the procedure yourself using the internet. You'll end up scaring yourself to death. There is so much rubbish on the net about all medical issues it's just not reliable and causes more trouble than it's worth.

2 DO discuss with your surgeon at the pre-op. Explain to him your concerns and that you're a sax player. He or she should be able to set your mind at rest.

I've not had any proper operative procedures, but have had a load of dental work, and I'm missing nine of my front teeth, so I understand the concern about sax playing being messed up. In my case, it was a detailed discussion with my dentist about options, in the light of being a sax player which helped a lot, and the outcome was fine for me.

Best wishes for a speedy recovery and a good outcome.

Jon
 

llamedos

Senior Member
Messages
431
I would re-iterate jonf's advice and recommend that you discuss procedures and possible outcomes with the appropriate professionals rather than relying on t'interweb. In this case, a dental surgeon is likely to be more approachable than a facio-maxillary surgeon and should be in a good position to advise on a likely prognosis. I say this purely because most people tend to have an ongoing and relatively long-standing relationship with their dental surgeon and will usually find them easier to talk to. I am aware that their knowledge base extends far beyond teeth and gums!

I wish you the best of progress at what must be a very worrying time and sincerely hope that you will be blowing successfully for many years to come.

Dave.
 

Jeanette

Organizress
Cafe Moderator
Messages
25,891
1 DO NOT try to research the procedure yourself using the internet. You'll end up scaring yourself to death. There is so much rubbish on the net about all medical issues it's just not reliable and causes more trouble than it's worth.

2 DO discuss with your surgeon at the pre-op. Explain to him your concerns and that you're a sax player. He or she should be able to set your mind at rest.


Jon
I agree with Jon, wishing you a speedy recovery.


:blowkiss:

To make it better

Jx
 

Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,657
I'm sorry that I can't give you any useful advice. I think you've had the best non professional advice your going to get. I wish you all the best for a speedy recovery
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,124
Apparently there's a small(ish) chance of damage to the facial nerve. I'm a bit scared this may affect (or knacker?) my sax playing. Does anyone have any experience/knowledge/second-hand anecdotes which might help me?
Lower wisdom teeth on the jaw have the same chance, maybe more. I had some complications on one of them, but I only managed to scare my dentist, that called me every day for weeks.

And discuss the issue with the surgeon.
I wouldn't worry too much, though.

Get well soon.
 

PaulM

Member
Messages
143
This is only an anecdote, but a very good friend of mine had a similar op a few months ago. He was also told about potential nerve damage and it worried him hugely - and he's no musician. His op went fine and more importantly the lump turned out to be benign. After the op the surgeon spoke to my pal and said "I've never removed such a large one, it's a whopper. Would you mind if we kept it as I'd like to use it as an example with my students?". Despite the lump being of the jumbo variety my friend only had a few weeks of discomfort after which his face has pretty much returned to normal already.

Do discuss the procedure with the professionals, they know what they're talking about and have relevent experience.

Have a speedy recovery and get back on the sax.
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
Thanks, everyone. I feel a bit guilty about worrying so much when people have far worse to contend with. But I had been assuming that, as the lump is so near the surface, it would be not much worse than having a mole removed.

It won't be for two or three months as it's non-urgent so that gives me plenty of time to wite down some questions for the pre-op.
 
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BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
This is only an anecdote, but a very good friend of mine had a similar op a few months ago. He was also told about potential nerve damage and it worried him hugely - and he's no musician. His op went fine and more importantly the lump turned out to be benign. After the op the surgeon spoke to my pal and said "I've never removed such a large one, it's a whopper. Would you mind if we kept it as I'd like to use it as an example with my students?". Despite the lump being of the jumbo variety my friend only had a few weeks of discomfort after which his face has pretty much returned to normal already.

Do discuss the procedure with the professionals, they know what they're talking about and have relevent experience.

Have a speedy recovery and get back on the sax.
That's just the kind of anecdote I was hoping for! My lump is not too big (~1.5cm) and they seem pretty confident it's benign from the biopsy.
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,124
Thanks, everyone. I feel a bit guilty about worrying so much when people have far worse to contend with. But I had been assuming that, as the lump is so near the surface, it would be not much worse than having a mole removed.
Don't feel guilty. I panic every time i smell a dentist.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Had a similar scare myself last year. Was told it was only stones in the gland. Big relief. If they've said it's benign, nothing to worry about really. Just have a good chat with the surgeon, as the others have said.

I'm sure it will all go well.
 

Andrew Sanders

Northern Commissioner for Caslm
Messages
2,773
Good luck Martin. Luckily I've had no such scare so no advice.
Let us know how you get on. Best wishes for a full recovery.
Andy
 

ArtyLady

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,030
Will keep my fingers crossed for you (apart from when I'm playing of course! ;} ) I hope all goes well.
 
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Taz

Busking Oracle
Messages
3,657
What the surgeon said

"I've never removed such a large one, it's a whopper. Would you mind if we kept it as I'd like to use it as an example with my students?"



What the surgeon actually meant

"I've never removed such a large one, it's a whopper. Would you mind if we kept it as a paper weight?"
 

breathless

Member
Messages
270
Good luck and im sure everything will be fine, its human nature to fear the worse.

I would agree not to research on the internet, you will scare yourself.

I had a procedure last year and was told in the pre-assessment everything would be fine, they just neglected to tell me what could and did happen.

I would say that given your situation pester the pants off the doctor to get every bit of information you can get out of them!
they do this stuff all the time and its just another day at the office for them, if they had told me about taking one simple product it would have saved me so much pain for the best part of a week, but all I got was "oh im ever so sorry I should have told you about that".

dont mean to worry you but if making you a little more cautious and less trusting then maybe you will get all the facts which could lead to a better outcome.

having said that, ive had a few procedures now and im glad we have the health system we do (going private doesn't always mean it will be better, 1st knee opp failed).

on a whole ive a lot of time for the nurses and doctors, doctors get paid well for there skills and the nurses dont get paid enough but we`d be stuck with out them.

im sure you'll be fine, they are fantastic people and will get you fixed up.

Lee.
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,904
Thanks, Lee. I don't think you need worry about me being too trusting where the medical profession is concerned! I've been lucky enough to reach 53 without needing to spend a night in hospital on my own account. But my wife, who is severely disabled and therefore not a run-of-the-mill patient, has had mixed experiences, to say the least. Having said that, she's just had a bout of pneumonia (while on holiday---oh, joy!) and the staff at Derriford hospital in Plymouth were (mostly) great.
 

SallySax

Member
Messages
75
I can't offer any anecdotes or advice, but would like to offer my very best wishes for a good outcome and a very speedy recovery!

All the best

Sallie
x
 

saxyman

Member
Messages
267
Understandable that you would be nervous about it. You are only human.
I am sure everything will be fine, have faith in your consultant, but do raise your concerns with him/her.
All the best.
Dave
 
Saxholder Pro
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