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tenorviol

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For some weird reason as a choral singer, there are only 2 works you expect everyone to be able to sing in harmony from memory - this is one of them. The other pertains to winter solstitial festivals... and involves dings being donged.
 

tenorviol

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Madrigals are quite good fun to sing - some are really difficult, they're not all 'fa la la' type at all. They would suit being arranged for sax quartet (most are in four parts, a few are in more).

I have the Oxford Book of Madrigals so might have a look at things to arrange for the Café Polyphony Sax Ensemble...
 
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David Dorning

David Dorning

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Madrigals are quite good fun to sing - some are really difficult, they're not all 'fa la la' type at all. They would suit being arranged for sax quartet (most are in four parts, a few are in more).

I have the Oxford Book of Madrigals so might have a look at things to arrange for the Café Polyphony Sax Ensemble...
I adapted "Maying" from the Penguin book of Madrigals. Four voices converted to SATTB. The fas and las are a bit of a tonguing challenge, not my forte I realise.

@nigeld posted some nice madrigals in the Resources section some time ago.
 

tenorviol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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I adapted "Maying" from the Penguin book of Madrigals. Four voices converted to SATTB. The fas and las are a bit of a tonguing challenge, not my forte I realise.

@nigeld posted some nice madrigals in the Resources section some time ago.
There are two books: The Oxford Book of English Madrigals and The Oxford Book of Italian Madrigals. I might do Arcadelt's Il bianco e dolce cigno, which Orlando Gibbons responded to some decades later with The Silver Swan

The Arcadelt dates to 1531
View: https://youtu.be/XITlmDJ9-Hk


The Gibbons dates to 1610

In both the use of dissonance is interesting.
View: https://youtu.be/6JfG1DMtlDI?list=TLPQMDIwNTIwMjCraLThy5AZOA
 

tenorviol

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@tenorviol ,remember to write my part in treble clef.
Nah - you just sight-read the bass clef as though it was treble and remember to add three sharps to the key signature - just watch out for the accidentals >:) That'll put you in D major - endless hours of fun...
 

Vetinari

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C'mon tv you know I can only just read what we play now. Please don't make it harder.
 

tenorviol

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C'mon tv you know I can only just read what we play now. Please don't make it harder.
Weird thing is over the years since I started playing instruments (my first was bass viol in 2004) tutors seem to revel in giving me really difficult things to do.

I used to go to an early music summer school in Durham back then. I went as a novice bass viol player and a singer. One of the viol tutors is an amazing fretted instrument player (I think he teaches music at Oxford). I'd only been playing a few months that first summer school. I had no problems reading bass or treble clef then (I knew the theory of alto (C3) and tenor (C4) clefs but never used them back then). So, in one session we needed someone on a 'low' tenor line but lacked a tenor, so he gave the part to me saying, "You're a clever chap - play this..." which was in alto clef. So, sight reading renaissance consort music in a 4 / 2 and 6 / 2 time signature in alto clef...

Roll forward a couple of years and I bought a tenor viol. In the morning session was playing bass. Aforementioned tutor said: "You're a clever chap... here you go..." and gave me a piece with an F2 clef (that's the bass clef on the second line up instead of fourth... Then I played tenor using alto clef (that's the 'normal' clef for tenor viol). Later, with another tutor, I was playing tenor (bear in mind I've been playing tenor all of two days at this point) and get given music in octave treble (sounds an octave lower than written). Last session of the day, was playing in a 'broken consort' playing renaissance 'dance band' music with bass viol, theorbo, archlute, bandora, cittern, treble viol, recorder. I was playing bass viol reading bass clef - and for about ten minutes couldn't play a thing as my brain was so scrambled from having played so many different clefs that day...

It was a few years later that I took up cello (2011) and had to get to grips with tenor clef as well. I now realise that the F2 baritone clef is in fact the same as a tenor C4 clef, with the lines being DFACE... but that's a lot of hindsight. I often encounter pieces in orchestra where in the space of a couple of bars I can be playing in 3 clefs: bass, tenor, and treble. Players of single clef instruments, such as saxes or violin, don't realise how 'easy' a tie they have of it compared with say cellos, bassoons, some trombones, or violas.

What Stuart the tutor was doing was throwing stuff at me and not giving me time to worry and just 'getting on with it'. Was it challenging? Yes, but it pushes you to keep playing and worry less about the notes necessarily being right (that fixes itself) and you develop the skill to stay in the right place.

So... next time I arrange something for the group, I think I will put the sop part into French violin clef, alto and tenor into alto and tenor clef, and baritone into bass clef... should be fun...
 
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