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Embouchure on G5 to C6 using octave key

Andrej

New Member
Messages
26
Locality
Singapore
Hi!

I just started playing the tenor, it was my fourth practice today :D. I managed to get notes from low C (C4) to C5 great. I am using cloth as a mute to my bell, so no too much on the intonation, but I managed to control the loudness a bit of the notes as well. But when I get to D5, and I am suppose to use the octave key, in order to get the high notes I must get my embouchure a bit tighter(press a bit more with my low lip) than before. Especially when I get to G5 and up. By doing this I managed to play the C major from low C to C6. When I go up, I must as already said change the embouchure a little bit (tighten up). When I go down, if I keep it tight I can steel play all the way down, but it doesn't feel as comfortable and relaxed as before.

Can you please help me understand if I am doing the right thing or maybe I am doing something wrong, and where is my mistake?

Or maybe it's just my reed too soft (rico royal 1)? I am planning to move to a 1.5 in a few practice sessions, but I am not sure if this is the problem or not.

I am using an ESM piece with 0,084 opening.

Thank You
 

jbtsax

Well-Known Member
Café Supporter
Messages
9,062
Locality
Beautiful Springville, Utah USA
Let me give you a way to communicate better. On the saxophone the lowest C with all the fingers down is called C1 or "low C". The C an octave higher is called C2 or "middle C". The C with the octave key added is called C# or "high C". This is different than the names of the notes on the piano.

If there is any way to get a teacher to help you starting out, that would be the best way to go. Learning from a forum on the internet can help, but it is a poor substitute for face to face instruction. That said, here are a few basics that can help.
  • Generally speaking all of the notes in the regular range of the saxophone take the same embouchure.
  • In other words, we don't tighten for the high notes and loosen for the low notes.
  • A good way to check the tightness of your embouchure is to play the mouthpiece and neck separate from the saxophone. With the mouthpiece about halfway on the cork it should produce an E Concert on tenor.
  • As discussed in another thread a #1 reed is too soft! I suggest starting on the #2 for best results.
 

Andrej

New Member
Messages
26
Locality
Singapore
Let me give you a way to communicate better. On the saxophone the lowest C with all the fingers down is called C1 or "low C". The C an octave higher is called C2 or "middle C". The C with the octave key added is called C# or "high C". This is different than the names of the notes on the piano.

If there is any way to get a teacher to help you starting out, that would be the best way to go.

Thank you very much for the support. I said I keep my rico 1.0 for a day or two, since you mention it's easier to get the low notes. But I am definitely changing to 2.0. Thanks.

Regarding the professor, I will be moving from this place in 2-3 weeks, so I can't start a class right now. I already contacted a good professor back home. I try to get somewhere before meeting him. So the internet and people like yourself that are willing to help me are my best option until I start some classes.

Thank you
 

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