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Don't Tongue Notation

Veggie Dave

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Is there any notation that indicates that a note shouldn't be tongued or should only be tongued as lightly as possible?
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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Either an instruction to play legato or a slur over the affected notes. To play 'lightly' with little articulation would leggiero
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
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2,290
Not really. We have no markings at all, then we add staccato and accents etc to go less than full marked value or accented.
Nothing to go lighter. Down to the player to feel the nature of the music.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
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1,608
...seen with a 'cross out' when the composer wants NO tonguing....

...seen
GREYED OUT when composer calls for light tonguing....
 

Tenor Viol

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Not really. We have no markings at all, then we add staccato and accents etc to go less than full marked value or accented.
Nothing to go lighter. Down to the player to feel the nature of the music.
I don't agree - that's what slurs are for and also the articulation instructions 'legato' and 'leggiero'
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
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2,290
Yes you are correct re classical. I presumed that Dave was talking about section playing which uses jazz language. Unless a section is completely slurred, or staccato all notes will often be left unmarked. It's up to the player to know how heavy/light to articulate.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
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Some confusion here
Is there any notation that indicates that a note shouldn't be tongued or should only be tongued as lightly as possible?
I preseume you are talking about starting notws with no tongue articulation, but not slurring from a previous note. ie starting from nothing?
Either an instruction to play legato or a slur over the affected notes.
So not slurring
To play 'lightly' with little articulation would leggiero
I didn't know that.
Yes. They're called "slurs".
See above, I don't think dave is talking about slurs.
...seen with a 'cross out' when the composer wants NO tonguing....

...seen
GREYED OUT when composer calls for light tonguing....
Never seen that.

Staring a (non-legato) note without tonguing is common as a sort of effct when soloing. Can sound a bit like "F" as the air eases into the mouthpiece. And of course the saxohpnoe laugh is done by "K" articulation as opposed to T or D.

My understanding though is that all tonguing should be light tip of the tongue, unless marked otherwise.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
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2,290
I repeat Dave's question:

Is there any notation that indicates that a note shouldn't be tongued or should only be tongued as lightly as possible?
My understanding though is that all tonguing should be light tip of the tongue, unless marked otherwise.
Correct.
 

Pete Thomas

Chief of Stuff
Commercial Supporter
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13,732
There is also a notation of legato tonguing, which is a series of notes with tenuto marks and a slur, see B

tonguing.png
 
Last edited:

jbtsax

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I was taught that depending upon the style of the piece, the tempo, and dynamic level some phrases (usually slurred) are best started with a "breath entrance". Some call it a "breath attack" which I have never cared for since we don't "attack" notes, we play them. This type of entrance is sometimes used to imitate a bowed string instrument or the voice.

In my experience "articulation markings" are often interpreted differently in a jazz chart than in a classical piece---mostly in terms of intensity or exaggeration. This can also depend upon the tempo and style of the jazz arrangement.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
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2,290
In my experience "articulation markings" are often interpreted differently in a jazz chart than in a classical piece---mostly in terms of intensity or exaggeration. This can also depend upon the tempo and style of the jazz arrangement.
Totally agree. Though with no song or other information available other than a written note on its own, both classical and all other music presume a light tongue start/attack.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
2,290
I was taught that depending upon the style of the piece, the tempo, and dynamic level some phrases (usually slurred) are best started with a "breath entrance".
I was never taught this - but I'm not saying that you're wrong here.
 
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