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Do the notes in a gliss have to conform to the scale of the tune

Kath

Member
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119
This may be a dumb question - apologies if it is - but for instance, the gliss at the start of Baker Street runs (as I understand it) from D to D - as the tune is in the scale of D (I think) does that mean the gliss should adop F and C sharps - or does it simply run D E F G A B C D . . . . . .

Thank you to anyone patient enough to answer such a basic I'm sure question!
 

Tenor Viol

Full of frets in North Shropshire
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5,946
A glissando is just a slide from note to note, on a stringed instrument, you just slide your finger along the fingerboard and only worry about the starting and ending notes. I suspect on sax you just run your fingers through whatever notes you can do in teh time available. I suspect for a slow gliss you go chromatically in semi-tones
 

ArtyLady

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1,030
Yes it needs the F# and C# but I must admit I tend to leave out the D and just run it each time from the F#.
I usually leave some notes out (if it doesn't notice) if it makes a fast gliss less complicated. :D
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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5,952
I suppose the answer is to try a bunch of different scales to gliss and see which sounds best.

Chromatics are always good, but if you really want to be flash you could try a diminished/whole tone one starting on D just for the hell of it.
 

Jazzaferri

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,667
When I do it I gliss up the harmonic minor scale in this one.....I like the sound and it is easier when there are two first altos....though my seat mate is in Mexico til April so I am alone in the first chair.
 
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