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Saxophones Corton Deluxe. Yanagisawa?

Skabbet

New Member
Messages
18
Thomas' Corton DeLuxe photos here: http://s297.photobucket.com/user/thomsax/media/cortondeluxegravyr.jpg.html?sort=3&o=21

Found in a thread here (about 3/4 way down): Yanagisawa Stencils

His blurb about it also here: Saxophones - Corton de Luxe alto

If you page back and forth you'll see the bell brace is different between yours and the one in his photos.

Hopefully Thomas will drop by and explain more....

More links which may help:
Corton De Luxe and Majestic
Vintage Yanagisawas | The Woodwind Forum
Corton de Luxe (Yanagisawa?)

Thank you very much! Many great answers in less then 24h!! Yes I can see that the corton deluxe and the Brace are different on the Bell. Maybe his is older or maybe mine is. Hopefully mine has the yani logo on the back. I Will see the sax this week I think. And we are still waiting for the corton deluxe-wizard Thomas! :D
 
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thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,923
Corton Deluxe expert!! I just owned a couple of these saxes and they are good saxes. The Corton Deluxe that I've seen vere built by Yanagisawa. The one on my Photobucket site was made around 1975. Most saxes had goldlauqer body and tube with nickelplated keys. But also silverplated Corton Deluxe reached the market. The late Corton Deluxe were keyed from F#-Bb (sop, alto, tenor) and F-low A (bari). I know a bariplayer that is blowing a silverplated Corton Deluxe to low A. A very good sax. If you know the serial number I think it's possible to say when your sax was built.
 

Skabbet

New Member
Messages
18
Corton Deluxe expert!! I just owned a couple of these saxes and they are good saxes. The Corton Deluxe that I've seen vere built by Yanagisawa. The one on my Photobucket site was made around 1975. Most saxes had goldlauqer body and tube with nickelplated keys. But also silverplated Corton Deluxe reached the market. The late Corton Deluxe were keyed from F#-Bb (sop, alto, tenor) and F-low A (bari). I know a bariplayer that is blowing a silverplated Corton Deluxe to low A. A very good sax. If you know the serial number I think it's possible to say when your sax was built.
Thanks!! Sounds good! I Will take a look at the serial number when o get the sax. I Think the description of the sax was sax with silver mechanics. Could It be the silver plated you talked about. Did you take a look at the pics?
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Looks and feels different. Also the nickel doesn't tarnish.

But... For a long time it was seen as a high quality option, it wears better than silver, stays shiney. But doesn't have the same look/feel. And some people are allergic to it.
 

Skabbet

New Member
Messages
18
Corton Deluxe expert!! I just owned a couple of these saxes and they are good saxes. The Corton Deluxe that I've seen vere built by Yanagisawa. The one on my Photobucket site was made around 1975. Most saxes had goldlauqer body and tube with nickelplated keys. But also silverplated Corton Deluxe reached the market. The late Corton Deluxe were keyed from F#-Bb (sop, alto, tenor) and F-low A (bari). I know a bariplayer that is blowing a silverplated Corton Deluxe to low A. A very good sax. If you know the serial number I think it's possible to say when your sax was built.
The sax I found had the lyre logo and stamp Japan. Woho! Also the serial number was 273148. Could It be that 73 is the year it was made? I read that the second and third number often is the year made.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
The sax I found had the lyre logo and stamp Japan. Woho! Also the serial number was 273148. Could It be that 73 is the year it was made? I read that the second and third number often is the year made.
did you buy it?
 

jeremyjuicewah

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,890
Just a word in agreement with Colin the bear. I have a Corton Tenor, no stencil redemption, made in the Czech Republic where a lot of very high class engineering was and is quite normal. As well as the rubbish. Like most places. I lived in the Czech Republic and didn't enjoy it all that much, but to write off a Czech product as a bit of rubbish eastern European tat is a misinformed attitude. Though its not a thoroughbred its sturdy, plays fine up and down, is a very decent instrument and the one bad thing in design (the octave key) I had modified and its now a standby sax I am very happy to own at a price that wouldn't break your heart if it was nicked out of the car. Eat my shorts sax snobs.

Bye the bye, I also own a Yamaha wind controller and voice box. Unlike the Corton, I don't want to own it. See yardsale.
Happy weekend
Mike
 

Ads

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,316
The amazing thing about that Corton was that it survived the trip to Spain in the worst case imaginable (Amati sax cases are suitcases with crude vaguely sax-shaped innards fitted) and still played from to to bottom when it got there (a fancy-ass Selmer would probably have fallen to bits) . I was well impressed with that horn, if it hadn`t been for the 1920s USA design LH table it`d still be here !! .. It did the Christmas carolling when the Yam 62 "Silver lady" was hiding in its case scared :eek:
 
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thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,923
Just a word in agreement with Colin the bear. I have a Corton Tenor, no stencil redemption, made in the Czech Republic where a lot of very high class engineering was and is quite normal. As well as the rubbish. Like most places. I lived in the Czech Republic and didn't enjoy it all that much, but to write off a Czech product as a bit of rubbish eastern European tat is a misinformed attitude. Though its not a thoroughbred its sturdy, plays fine up and down, is a very decent instrument and the one bad thing in design (the octave key) I had modified and its now a standby sax I am very happy to own at a price that wouldn't break your heart if it was nicked out of the car. Eat my shorts sax snobs.

Bye the bye, I also own a Yamaha wind controller and voice box. Unlike the Corton, I don't want to own it. See yardsale.
Happy weekend
Mike

I like the the saxes that were made behind the "iron curtain"! The manufactors and workers did a great job with less resources. The Czechoslovakia made saxes from the 70's are still on the second hand market but I seldom find any PRC or ROC made saxes from the 70's. I think both DDR and Czechoslovakia saxes were wellbuilt. But I still think the Corton Deluxe was a better saxes than a Corton!?
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,488
Corton saxophones were GENERALLY made by Amati but it is possible the Yanagisawa made the Corton “ de luxe”.

The Amati-Corton were often hit and mis. I have played some decent ones and they are identical to Amati and similar to Musica Steyr ( also Amati-made but curiously often more expensive because they look nicer with their nice Art Deco engraving and nicer looking bell to body brace and key guards).


Yanagisawa-Corton-de-luxe was, I think, an A4 or T4, one of the earliest Yanagisawa saxophones and frankly speaking, not one of their best.

It is rather easy to recognize them because they have non balanced action mechanics and a very large left hand pinky plateau arrangement , almost circular.

The A and T 4 were stenciled under many different names ( I had an Astro) and had mechanics which were not featuring a balanced action and, were they not Yanagisawa horns, not too many people today would be fighting over them. They are nice horns but not to be compared to later A&T 5 or A&T 6 which were the Yanagisawa upon which their fame was really built.

They were good horns which I would be happy to define “intermediate” just because I couldn’t honestly define them as being a professional horn. They have the advantage to be cheapish but, in my view, not much better than many other saxophones made in the ’70 by the many Italian makers of the time.

Grassi “ jade rollers" would be a good example of a saxophone similarly built and with a good sound like a A&T 4.

I no longer have pictures of my Astro A4 but I found these on line

 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,488
Well, I have been around the block a couple of times. Thanks for your words of appreciation :)

But, I am not infallible and take every word always with a pinch of salt.

The reason why I took to buy and sell saxophones ( besides financing my hobby) was that by doing that one has to, by sheer necessity, learn a few things about the object of his trade. I had done the same with my previous hobby-trade, Design furniture.

There is nothing like buying and selling to stimulate knowledge.
 
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