All profit supporting special needs music education and Help Musicians
Tutorials

Saxophones conn new wonder I - what's that extra key between E and F (right hand)?

zannad

Member
Messages
410
I've just bought a Conn New Wonder I, dated 1924 (must be a pre-Chuck Berry model).
I'm very impressed by this horn...still, I'm puzzled about that key which is positioned between the E and the F key in the lower stack...what is it for? In my case it doesn't seem to operate at all apart from putting some extra pressure on the G# above it....or, there is something wrong with my sax?
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
LOL...thanks for correcting that "Chuck" - I thought there was a connection with the nickname given to the sax and that legendary Chuck (who played guitar!) - else, where does the name "Chu Berry" come from?
REad the link.... Quite a bit on the saxes there as well
 

Young Col

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,419
Chu Berry's real first name was Leon. When he arrived in New York in 1930 with a goatee beard a musician colleague said he looked like Chu Chin Chow and the name stuck . He was great tenor player who played and recorded with Benny Carter, Teddy Hill, Lionel Hampton and Cab Calloway among others. He was the only real challenger to Coleman Hawkins in the early 30's before Lester Young presented an alternative approach to playing and constructing jazz solos. Sadly Chu died after a car crash in 1941.
YC
 

Morgan Fry

Senior Member
Messages
447
It's a G# trill key. Better off without it IMO. Gets in the way and another linkage to keep regulated, like the extra Eb.
 

jonf

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,680
As above. I've got one on my Conn C mel, and also on my Buescher True Tone alto. Never used them.

You should also have a forked Eb. Finger 1 and 3 right hand should open a small vant on the back of the sax. Never used that either.
 

zannad

Member
Messages
410
As above. I've got one on my Conn C mel, and also on my Buescher True Tone alto. Never used them.

You should also have a forked Eb. Finger 1 and 3 right hand should open a small vant on the back of the sax. Never used that either.
I don't think I have a forked Eb...pressing both keys 1 and 3 isn't linked to any vent while key 2 is connected to the small vent on the back.
For the G# trill...the G-G# trill is much faster than doing it via the left pinky finger....at last I've found out some usefulness about that key; still, I agree, it isn't that worth bothering and it's no wonder it hasn't been adopted in modern saxophones.
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,959
I don't think I have a forked Eb...pressing both keys 1 and 3 isn't linked to any vent while key 2 is connected to the small vent on the back.
That's the Eb trill. You press RH 1 & 3 down to get an Eb and it leaves 2 standing...which if pressed closes the small vent and gives you D.
It's a common source of leaks unless the mechanism is in tip-top condition and the vent pad is well-seated.
A lot of players have the vent key closed - either by wedging it shut with a piece of cork or by reversing the spring.

Regards,
 

zannad

Member
Messages
410
That's the Eb trill. You press RH 1 & 3 down to get an Eb and it leaves 2 standing...which if pressed closes the small vent and gives you D.
It's a common source of leaks unless the mechanism is in tip-top condition and the vent pad is well-seated.
A lot of players have the vent key closed - either by wedging it shut with a piece of cork or by reversing the spring.

Regards,
Ok, got it!
So the mid finger is supposed to work better than the pinky one for the D-Eb trill - not a big deal really, all that fuss for an extra vent and extra nuisances...
 

Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,959
Ok, got it!
So the mid finger is supposed to work better than the pinky one for the D-Eb trill - not a big deal really, all that fuss for an extra vent and extra nuisances...
Rather than think of it as a D - Eb trill key, think of it as a low C - Eb jump key. It begins to make sense then...but only just.

Regards,
 

aldevis

Surrealist Contributor.
Cafe Moderator
Messages
12,125
Totally agree with Stephen. I have it on my Conn bari and C-Eb are much easier with the alternate fingering, also thanks to the fact that I find that, on Conn, C-Eb spatula is quite clumsy.
Years ago I remember a tenor (maybe a Buescher) that had a Gsharp OPENING key on the right hand.
 
Saxholder Pro

Staff online

Help!Mailing List
Top Bottom