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"Coltrane Changes"

randulo

Playing alto 25 months
Subscriber
Messages
3,508
Earlier today, @Pete Effamy commented on a thing I changed in the chords of Miss Jones. I'm pretty sure a saxophonist friend, Richard Aplanalp (L.A. giant in the 1070's) called this "Trane Changes", or I heard it on a recording somewhere. It's a simple thing to add to a ii V I, usually at the end of a section. In short, instead of two bars like this:

| Dm7 | .... | G7 | .... |

you use

Ebm7 | Ab7 | Dm7 | G7 |

I can picture Trane, McCoy or W-ynton Kelly using this, but I can't remember where I dredged it up.
I can't find any examples of this, if anyone can remember any, chime in here, I'd love to know.
 

Pete Effamy

Senior Member
Messages
1,807
Earlier today, @Pete Effamy commented on a thing I changed in the chords of Miss Jones. I'm pretty sure a saxophonist friend, Richard Aplanalp (L.A. giant in the 1070's) called this "Trane Changes", or I heard it on a recording somewhere. It's a simple thing to add to a ii V I, usually at the end of a section. In short, instead of two bars like this:

| Dm7 | .... | G7 | .... |

you use

Ebm7 | Ab7 | Dm7 | G7 |

I can picture Trane, McCoy or W-ynton Kelly using this, but I can't remember where I dredged it up.
I can't find any examples of this, if anyone can remember any, chime in here, I'd love to know.
I did know this, but not playing jazz solely I’d forgotten. My main point was that I hadn’t thought of using it in this tune on the turnaround.
I did work on Coltrane changes about 25 years ago and started to get a bit of a handle on them - but found that I couldn’t undo that way of thinking so, being inappropriate for most of my work I left the Coltrane experience alone.
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 25 months
Subscriber
Messages
3,508
I like to add a little spice to help cover my many faults. It also can be a nice change from III VI ii V I
 
OP
randulo

randulo

Playing alto 25 months
Subscriber
Messages
3,508
Now that this post is in Improv and Theory, I might mention that it's also a very common improvisational ploy to move up a half step without the background changing harmony to play outside.

Another case I have heard that works well, is in the well-know tune Bye Bye Blackbird. Of the first 8 bars of the A section, the first five are traditionally the I chord, usually F major. In the most common version bar six is F# dim, bar 7 and 8 V or C7. In the second half of that section, again 5 bars of C7, one of a more complex chord like C7+5 or 13-9 to emphasize the resolution to the I, F major. Once again, at the point before the return to the tonic F, the last two bars can be played.

|---bar 5--| ---6--- | ---7---|---8---|
|Gm ------| C7----| F maj ---------- | (traditional)
|Bye ------| Bye ---| Blackbird|-----|
|G#m C#7 | Gm C7| F maj ----------| (more 'edgy')

One of the reasons I like this is that it's fairly subtle. The casual listener isn't going to say, "Wuuuut? That's not how it goes!". Another is that it's easy to play if you know your major scales. In fact, if BBB is in F (I've seen it played in Bb and C), you can just play in F# during those "outside" bars.

Anyone have any other little moments to contribute?
 
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