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Cleaning raw brass

jbtsax

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Just out of curiosity...on the horn you posted here, why did you choose to go with Barkeeper's as opposed to Jax ?
I suppose mostly because I wanted to match the portion where I started. It also seemed to be abrasive enough to give a slightly "brushed" finish which would better match the keys. When I have used the Jax products in the past it is usually as just a first step, prior to buffing, or giving a scratch finish with the abrasive wheel.
 

Trav1s

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37
I have two vintage Conn trombones with bare brass bells - one is the inner/outer surfaces and the other is only the outer. I have been using Wright's Brass polish on these bells and the inner surface of the brass outer slide tubes per the trombone repair pros. Wrights is water based and rinses off easily. I apply it with terry cloth and most of the time spots come off easily. If not, a little bit of pressure and plenty of polish and the spots are gone. I follow the cleaning with Mother's California Gold carnuba paste wax.

Wrights.jpg





As for Brasso, it is ammonia based and much more abrasive. I have been advised to avoid it by multiple techs in the tbone repair world, even on the exterior of a bell flare.
 

Stephen Howard

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1,701
As for Brasso, it is ammonia based and much more abrasive. I have been advised to avoid it by multiple techs in the tbone repair world, even on the exterior of a bell flare.
I'm always curious about metal polishes I haven't heard of before because I live in hope that someone has discovered a new way to clean brass.
So I headed off to the Wright's site and pulled up the safety data sheets - and whaddya know? Acid (oxalic) and ammonia.
 

Dibbs

Member
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603
I'm always curious about metal polishes I haven't heard of before because I live in hope that someone has discovered a new way to clean brass.
So I headed off to the Wright's site and pulled up the safety data sheets - and whaddya know? Acid (oxalic) and ammonia.
I thought that can't be right if it's water based. They'd react to form ammonium oxalate. Looking at the safety data and it actually says anhydrous ammonia so there is no water in it. The solvent is a mixture of propylene glycol and isopropyl alcohol.
 

Stephen Howard

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1,701
I thought that can't be right if it's water based. They'd react to form ammonium oxalate. Looking at the safety data and it actually says anhydrous ammonia so there is no water in it. The solvent is a mixture of propylene glycol and isopropyl alcohol.
There seems to be some confusion on the site too - one of the FAQs for the brass cleaner (the smaller bottle) says there's no oxalic acid in it.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
1,129
I'm always curious about metal polishes I haven't heard of before because I live in hope that someone has discovered a new way to clean brass.
So I headed off to the Wright's site and pulled up the safety data sheets - and whaddya know? Acid (oxalic) and ammonia.
Interesting, although I will confirm what Travis noted - Wrights Polish is not as aggressive/abrasive as Brasso.

But I guess this also sorta confirms what you were noted, Stephen: it is more the abrasiveness of the particles IN the cream polish than the chemical makeup of the cream itself.

Also - just so not to create confusion for future perusers of this convo, the Wrights product I use and have been referring to on this site is their Copper Cream, which is applied with water and a sponge (so obviously requires complete disassembly) as either a second cleaning step after a chem bath...or I sometimes suggest it for DIY'ers who do not wish to take their horn to a tech for a bath, but need an agent more effective than a paste polish:


Screen Shot 2020-01-14 at 9.03.42 AM.png
 

Trav1s

Member
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37
If the Copper Cream is anything like the Silver Cream (which I use for mouthpieces) then I am sure it is a solid choice.
 

JayeNM

Formerly JayePDX
Messages
1,129
The Silver Cream totally rocks, too - yes, it is what I use as for the same stage of work on silverplate horns (post-chem bath, pre-hand polish).
Sometimes when my bath solution had gone bad, or weak, I have even used the Silver Cream as the main 'cleaner', and it did a good job on its own, too....
 
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