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cleaning keys on my sax

C_Claudemonster

Formerly saxgirl22
Messages
399
Hello, I have recently (very recently) accquired a Grassi alto sax which I like very much. It plays nice but the nickel/chrome keywork has taken on a dull appearance and I want to clean it myself. My question is how? how do i get it shiny and what is best to use so i don't hurt the sax in any way. My dad lent me some 'autosol' chrome cleaning paste for a duff old clarinet I have and it has cleaned the keys up nice but I'm wary of using it on a sax that I have paid nearly £300 for! this paste is meant for polishing the wheels on his Lotus car and perhaps not my clari!
any help and suggestions would be very much appreciated :)
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,279
If autosol worked on your clari it will work on your alto, autosol does what it says on the tin, it cleans 'metal' just try it in a small area before pasting all over your sax.
I can't see it having any detrimental effect on the sax, but i would just try a small area on the back of the sax first.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Autosol is abrasive. Don't use it!!!!

Not only does it clean the muck off, but also the metal - and worse, it'll get into the mechanism and jam/clog things up.

Just use a moist silver cloth.
 

griff136

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,048
Autosol is abrasive. Don't use it!!!!

Not only does it clean the muck off, but also the metal - and worse, it'll get into the mechanism and jam/clog things up.

Just use a moist silver cloth.

Kev the OP said the keys were Nickel/chrome so a silver polishing cloth wont get far in cleaning the keywork..

I use autosol on nickel keys to bring them to a better state or on the buffing machine it the pads have been removed. if you do use autosol or wenol etc be careful to put the stuff on your cloth, and not too much either, and be careful not to get any on the pads. you could also use 0000 grade wire wool - sound harsh but it does the job.
 

C_Claudemonster

Formerly saxgirl22
Messages
399
hiya, thanks for the advice. I did do all the keys on my £25 clari with autosol lastnight and they have come up looking a treat but don't know what they will look like in the long term. Maybe I'll leave the sax to a professional! as it's not something I want to ruin!
cheers :)
 

Rogerb

Member
Messages
764
Just to re-iterate:
I have used Solvol Autosol for YEARS, as a metal polish on chromium plate, brass, copper, nickel and stainless steel, on all of which it is very effective.
But it is an abrasive 'paste' and is, therefore completely unsuited to use on precious metals or plated surfaces(other than chromium).
It also, of course, as has been said, dries as a powdery deposit, which must be removed carefully from any delicate 'mechanical bits'.
So, really, as far as claris/saxes go, probably only suited for use on tarnished nickel keys which have been dismantled, and can have any deposits completely removed.
I guess it would be good to clean the gunge off an unlacquered dismantled brass sax, but it would be a tedious job!
 
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Stephen Howard

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,094
Autosol is fine for nickel plate - and is about the only thing that will bring a shine to it short of buffing it with a machine.
I'd stick to using it only on the key cups though - if you use it on the key barrels it might get into the action...and that wouldn't be good.

Personally though I wouldn't bother - nickel plate soon dulls again.

Regards,
 

Targa

Among the pigeons
Subscriber
Messages
8,978
Whatever you use the efffect will obviously depend on the quality and thickness of the chrome.
My A40 in the sixties was falling apart with rust but the bumpers still looked good whereas the chrome trim on my yamaha bike in the eighties was flaking off after a year.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
Autosol is fine for nickel plate - and is about the only thing that will bring a shine to it short of buffing it with a machine.
I'd stick to using it only on the key cups though - if you use it on the key barrels it might get into the action...and that wouldn't be good.

Personally though I wouldn't bother - nickel plate soon dulls again.

Regards,

Once again I'll recommend Stephens "Saxophone Manual" :thumb:
The answers to all of the questions you are likely to have on saxophone maintenance are contained within its pages :welldone

I think I've got the right thread this time :confused:

John :):):):):):);}
 
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