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Clean your sax without chemicals!

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,199
Location
Sweden
Try this. I use it inside the tube/neck as well. Just dampen a swab and pull through a couple of times. You can use peels from lemon, lime, grapefruit ... as well. Or tutti frutti? Your sax will play that song very good after a treatment with this stuff!?:)


Make your own natural cleaning products that are free of chemicals.

It’s time for spring cleaning! We want to tell about something that we think is absolutely terrific. A cleanser that easily is made of products you have at home and is so natural that one can drink it if you want. Not only did it have natural ingredients, it is also very effective. We at Food fraud has now "test driven" this cleaner in a month at home and we are not impressed. It works great as detergent and to clean both Windows and tiles. We have received reports from acquaintances who also used it successfully as a degreaser on their cars.

How does it work? Vinegar is an old proven cleaning solution that solves both the lime and grease stains. It is also very effective to kill mold spores and bacteria. Citrus Peel contains a substance called limonene, which is effective for resolving dirt. The famous put often contain a synthesized limonene, but in this case, you get the real thing.

Try making a means that you know what it contains, it is environmentally friendly and mild so that even kids can join in and clean.


1. Add the peel from two oranges (preferably organic) in a jar. It also goes well with other citrus fruits.

2. Fill with ättikssprit (normal strong 12%-in) until it covers the shells.

3. Allow to stand for two weeks.

4. Strain the liquid and pour it into a spray bottle up to half. Fill the bottle with water (you want 50/50 with water and apelsinättikan).

Now you have an effective, nontoxic and environmentally friendly cleaning products.

We wish you good luck with your spring cleaning! (Translated by Bing


ättikagengöring.jpg
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Isn't vinegar mainly acetic acid? Remember using it as a stop bath in my darkrooms. Always thought of it as a chemical, but then plants are cleverer than this mere vegetarian. Maybe should become a fruitarian.

Not angry, not aimed to be destructive but if you ever achieve a chemical free status, you are brown bread.
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Café Supporter
Messages
21,912
Location
Just north of Munich
Isn't vinegar mainly acetic acid? Remember using it as a stop bath in my darkrooms. Always thought of it as a chemical, but then plants are cleverer than this mere vegetarian. Maybe should become a fruitarian.

Not angry, not aimed to be destructive but if you ever achieve a chemical free status, you are brown bread.

Yes, vinegar is acetic acid. Not at 12%, usually much less like 4-6%.

As for chemical free/brown bread, chemical free is only a temporary state until the undertakers pickle you.>:)
 
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milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,488
Location
the Netherlands
as much as I like vinegar (my family has been in the vinegar trade since 1889) I would also caution to use it on any part of the saxophone other than the neck and even then, do this only after you remove the octave key and rinse plenty of times (and I mean that) after treating.

DON’T USE IT ON SILVERPLATE !!!! Make sure you don’t spill any on the springs!

Vinegar is not normally sold in that concentration .........12% (which cannot normally be reached naturally.........so this must be of chemical origin and not a product of fermentation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetic_acid ) and not even normally transported, in fact the European norms state that any substance containing more than 9% of acidity has to be transported as a special chemical transport for a reason.
 
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DavidUK

Well-Known Member
Café Supporter
Messages
5,553
Location
Near Lutterworth, Leics.
Isopropyl Alcohol, available from your chemist, is a great cleaner and degreaser. I often use it on a cotton bud for awkward areas, particularly when cleaning the metal parts of guns. It moistens the dirt so it can be removed but any alcohol residue evaporates.

Not sure what effect it would have on pads, but I'm guessing it would help clean away any deposits and leave them unaffected by the alcohol itself.

:)
 

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