Jazz Clapping on one and three

randulo

Playing saxophone 20 months - 2.3% of my life
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HAHAHAHA, what a find!

Almost every person in French audiences does this. I start every tune clapping on 2 and four to lead the way, but one verse in they're on one and three! Funny thing is, I am working on a song right now in this genre, called "My Baby Snores".
 
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aldevis

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nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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Personally I think that people ought to clap on beats 1, 2, 3 and 4.
Leaving out beats is just plain lazy.

If the piece is slow, for example a ballad, then clapping on half-beats should be encouraged.

But under no circumstances is clapping on quarter-beats permissible.
 

nigeld

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That transition was so subtle and seamless, I played it back several times to figure out how it was done. Did the piano player add a beat, or did he lose a beat? I can't really tell.
Edited:
As far as I can tell, he plays a 5-beat bar.
 
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randulo

Playing saxophone 20 months - 2.3% of my life
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I don't know if any of you have marched or been in the military, but there's a trick when you're out of step. You skip and it inverses right and left legs., putting you back in step.
 
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Jazzaferri

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I'm with adding a beat.

And then there are those that do the double clap on 2 and 1 clap on four. Its a bit odd when it doesn't quite match the feel of the piece.
 

Halfers

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He looks relieved when they both stop at the same time.
Reich mentions at the very end that the guy on the left only had one rehearsal, so he probably was :)

I think with these pieces, there is no defined length for each sequence of clapping. The guy on the left nods his head to signal a change is coming. It's the same with Reich's longer pieces. Earlier in the Year I saw The London Sinfonietta perform this and a couple more Reich pieces, including Music For 18 Musicians. The Band Leader used the same technique to indicate a change was a gonna come..(there was no clapping along during that performance, thankfully...)
 
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aldevis

aldevis

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I'm with adding a beat.

And then there are those that do the double clap on 2 and 1 clap on four. Its a bit odd when it doesn't quite match the feel of the piece.
There are drummers like that: they can only play "tun dadatun dah" but they are spread around a variety of genres
 

Dibbs

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That transition was so subtle and seamless, I played it back several times to figure out how it was done. Did the piano player add a beat, or did he lose a beat? I can't really tell.
He adds a beat. The left hand is silent for a beat and then resumes the pattern from the start.
 
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