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careless whisper

SopranoSimon

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Darlington
do you know at the start of the chorus for george michaels careless whisper, he goes up the notes very fast, what do you call that and how would i do it for that song using a soprano please, can you say what notes i play , he like goes up the scale very fast for that special affect.
 

Colin the Bear

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Burnley bb9 9dn
Put the record on. Play saxophone to record. Use notes that sound right.

NB To the best of my knowledgeMr Michael does not play saxophone

I think Glissando is the term.
 

Young Col

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A slide or rapid movement up or down a scale. Quite often over an interval of several tones/semitones but doesn't have to be. Usually notated by a short wavy line between the starting note ( or a notional starting note ) and the note it ends up on.
 

Pete Thomas

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It's a bit naughty editing the original post after answers have been given. :confused2:

That's right, (against forum rules I believe) I have reverted it to the original as this will be more useful to members anyway. Also aded tags.
 

Pete Thomas

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usually with a glissando the effect is done so quickly that many of the notes are ghosted, so impossible to say what they are.

However a player would tend to have in mind a set of notes that could either be the scale of the current key centre often the same as the key of the tune) but may be adapted to miss out any notes that do not fall quickly under the fingers or even use non key notes instead.

For example if I am doing a gliss in the key of C major up to a high note such as top E, I might use an ascending scale of C but so as to avoid the awkward B to C transition at a very high speed I might just use C# instead of C. The fact that it is so fast (or ghosted) means it doesn't pop out as a wrong note.

In other cases a play may choose to use a chromatic scale.

I can't answer what happens in this actual song though as I don't have it to hand. I'm someone knows
 

spike

Old Indian
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Half way up a hill
Haven't needed to play it for an awful long time, best played on alto, but on sop I guess you could gliss up from the B to the F# through B-D-E-F#. If you listen closely to the original the notes are in fact separated. It's not as smooth a gliss as in Rhapsody in Blue. Have fun.

P.S. I think it's actually an octave on the original but on sop that would be aardvark, so you could get away with B to F# as I suggested above.
 

jools28

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139
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United Kingdom
If you go to musicnotes.com you can get a free sample of the first page of the song which contains the sax part-you can search for whatever instrument you like and get the notes for the first page as sample or buy the whole song. I play by ear but I did need the music to know how to play that part.
 
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