SYOS

Building up my jazz vocabulary

half diminished

Senior Member
Messages
1,302
I'm looking for some new inspiration to help improve my jazz vocabulary and I'm working through a number of solo transcriptions and real books and listening to all and sundry trying to pick up some new ideas as a basis for some new riffs/licks of my own.

Anyone got any favourite licks or riffs they want to share? :)
 

saxnik

Member
Messages
381
I've only got two, and I'm not sharing!!

Seriously though, I ought to think about this too. I tend to use the standard-learning tritone sub from Mark Levine's book far too much over ii-V7-I's, that or use (for example) arpeggiated Dm-G#dim-C patterns instead.

I also quote other tunes far too much to be accused of tasteful playing...

Nick
 

caruso

New Member
Messages
22
Transcribing from records yourself is really the best way to learn jazz vocabulary. I would suggest listening to your favorite saxophonist and stealing a lick or to from them. Then once you have the lick use the transcribed lick as a module to create your own licks.

If your looking for written out stuff then just do a google search. There are plenty of free jazz licks, and transcriptions out there that you could use.
 

half diminished

Senior Member
Messages
1,302
Transcribing from records yourself is really the best way to learn jazz vocabulary. I would suggest listening to your favorite saxophonist and stealing a lick or to from them. Then once you have the lick use the transcribed lick as a module to create your own licks.

If your looking for written out stuff then just do a google search. There are plenty of free jazz licks, and transcriptions out there that you could use.

Yeh I do all that and I work through the Real Books trying out phrases etc but..... what about the stuff I never get to hear or see 'cos I've never heard of it. Thought there might be some recommendations but obviously this post hasn't fired any real interest. Hey ho.
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
5,959
In 38 years of playing I don't think I've ever learned a 'jazz lick'. Which isn't to say that I don't have bits and pieces that I tend to use a lot - it's just that I've never consciously learned them - they sort of evolve. I've never been a fan of solos that consist of a lot of clichés strung together but then I've never aspired to play bebop.
 

caruso

New Member
Messages
22
but..... what about the stuff I never get to hear or see 'cos I've never heard of it.

All I can say to your question is keep looking. You probably don't like that answer but that really is what you have to do. To find new stuff look in different places. Check out different players. You don't have to just listen to the big name guys. Of course you are probably already doing this. You just have to persevere.

As for licks I really don't have any that I can share. I'm more of an intuitive player and don't have set licks that I practice. I focus more on the colors I can create and rely on my ear.

For me the best way to get new ideas is just to play and experiment. I also like to look at different elements that I hear other players us and try to incorporate them naturally into my playing.
 

BrianJoeSandy

Member
Messages
269
Sorry your getting cold water poured over you. I had the same idea. Now and then a phrase hits the spot and it would be nice to share it. So here is mine for today. It occurs in Yakety Sax. It is 2 bars plus a quaver. All notes from a minor 7 chord. Bm7 works well. (2) means double length
10b 7b 10b(2) 8 7b 5 3b 8 5 8(2) 7b 5 3b 1
actually the next phrase is pretty cool too
5b 5b 4 3b 5b 6b 6(2) 6(2) 5 b3
Too much?
I have a 58kb mp3 file (low res but gets the idea) but am not allowed to upload it. Tried deleting the .mp3.
 

GJ77

Senior Member
Messages
713
I like the Oliver Nelson 'Patterns For Improvisation' book. I find that it doesn't encourage direct lifting of licks but helps to expand the harmonic vocabulary of your own ideas...if that makes sense?
 

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