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Beginner bubbling condensate

allansto

Senior Member
Messages
471
bebopsop had a similar problem to me but seems to have solved his

My problem with spit/condensation seems to that it sits in the ledge between the mouth piece and the top end of the neck.
My cork does not appear to be too big. the spit/condensate seems to pool at the neck/mp joint and create a gurgling noise after I have been playing for 10 -15 mins.
I cant seen to shake it loose so I need to continually take the mp off and dry it out.
When I do this, quite a few drops of spit/condensation fall out.
Upon refit its fine again for another 10 mins.
P.S. Im playing a yam allegro tenor:confused::confused:.
 

BeBopSop

Member
Messages
274
Hi Allansto, these saxes can drive us mad! lol, do you get the gurgling on all the notes top to bottom?Or just the lower notes?
 

allansto

Senior Member
Messages
471
Im at a loss to explain whats goin on,
Usually I get it on the midle to upper range but,
Today I played for nearly 2 hrs and not one gurgle
I used a different reed to yesterday, but I dont think the gurglings coming from there,
Too many variables though, cos today I played standing up.
There are alot of factors here so I`m going to have to experiment and eliminate
for a while to sort it out. :confused:
 

zannad

Member
Messages
410
The cork might be big "enough" but still there might be some imperfections on it to allows some moisture to seep through...e.g. the joint of the cork might be a bit loose.
Another cause might be the reed...some aren't completely flat and won't seal completely.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
I would try wrapping some sticky tape tightly around the end of the cork to improve the seal. Do also make sure that you rotate your reeds so that they have some time to properly recover, and make sure that they are stored on a flat surface where the moisture can evaporate.
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
I wouldn't use sticky tape. Makes a big mess and the glue will end up inside the mouthpiece. Better would be the ptfe tape used by plumbers for sealing threads. Has no glue and does a good job for a while.
 

johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
I wouldn't use sticky tape. Makes a big mess and the glue will end up inside the mouthpiece. Better would be the ptfe tape used by plumbers for sealing threads. Has no glue and does a good job for a while.
As recommended in Stephen's, Haynes Saxophone Manual :thumb::thumb:
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
I bought some PTFE tape and applied it to my tenor crook - not impressed at all so have reinstated sellotape as my main addition. I found the PTFE so thin and weedy and I would have had to wrap it about 20x or 30x to get anywhere. Never experienced my mouthpieces ever picking up glue from said tape on either my soprano or tenor crooks, so will remain skeptical. I can appreciate that it is the sort of thing to wrap around slightly loose fitting screws etc. but seemed thin enough to be rather pointless, and rather unlikely to last.

So, I will be sticking with my original recommendation - just get decent tape and apply with some precision.
In which case I would latterly withdraw my thanks to KevvyG, even though I respect his views generally.
 
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kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
A word on the cork. These often compress down. If you carefully move/hold it over the steam from a boilling kettle it'll expand to it's original size in seconds. Just rotate it to get it evenly done all round. And watch the laquer on the neck. Best hold the crook in an oven glove, it shouldn't get hot, but if you overdo it....
 

zannad

Member
Messages
410
A word on the cork. These often compress down. If you carefully move/hold it over the steam from a boilling kettle it'll expand to it's original size in seconds. Just rotate it to get it evenly done all round. And watch the laquer on the neck. Best hold the crook in an oven glove, it shouldn't get hot, but if you overdo it....
sounds like a very useful tip...just one concern; how long does the cork treated in this way retain its shape?
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
sounds like a very useful tip...just one concern; how long does the cork treated in this way retain its shape?
Pretty much indefinately, unless the mpc is too tight. And if it compresses again, you can resteam. Can also use a flame, but it's too easy to overdo it and singe the cork.
 

allansto

Senior Member
Messages
471
Re: bubbling condensate

A word on the cork. These often compress down. If you carefully move/hold it over the steam from a boilling kettle it'll expand to it's original size in seconds. Just rotate it to get it evenly done all round. And watch the laquer on the neck. Best hold the crook in an oven glove, it shouldn't get hot, but if you overdo it....

Hey Kev that was an awsome idea
Steaming is definately the answer
I put my sax neck (cork) above the boiling kettle and quickly turned it over and over .
Lo and behold before my eyes in about 15 seconds the cork expanded back to its original size ( no more shrinkage or leakage.) You the man!!!!:welldone:welldone:welldone
I thought the cork looked a little squashed, but now I know it was.
Now I remember burning the corks on our clarinets 40 years ago, harsh I know.
Steamings the go. thanks Heaps.
Allansto
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
Just a tip someone on the forum gave me when I had the same problem a couple of years ago.
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
When I did it the cork nearly fell off and expanded in circumference by about 15%. If it were not for my trusty sellotape I would have to replace the cork. So, be warned...................................................................:shocked::w00t:;}
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
When I did it the cork nearly fell off and expanded in circumference by about 15%. If it were not for my trusty sellotape I would have to replace the cork. So, be warned...................................................................:shocked::w00t:;}
An update, I'd qualify this with - if the cork is properly stuck on you won't have the problem.

Just had the problem. On a neck cork I'd stuck on and the glue hadn't stuck properly... Net result was a new cork this afternoon. But it won't stop me steaming again if I need to. I'm just going to make darned sure that any more corks I do use proper contact adhesive or shellac...
 

TomMapfumo

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,219
I had better advise Selmer(Paris) to choose better glue in future..............................;}
 
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