Reeds Broken reeds?

Liz

New Member
Messages
9
Location
London
I'm sure this is a familiar question from a new saxophone player - still need to know the answer though! How can you tell when a reed needs replacing? I was diligently practising my scales this evening when I suddenly couldn't get a note at all. Fairly positive it wasn't me. I took the reed off and put it back on and resumed - although it sounded quite wooly.

Liz
 

Mamos

Member
Messages
691
Location
Falmouth Cornwall
I would imagine a reed wood have to be obviously dead to give no sound at all.

I play my reeds until they are chipped and split and really do need replacing.

It sounds like a leak to me

mamos
 

AlanU

Member
Messages
628
Location
Enfield, North London
An old reed doesn't just stop, something else has happened.

How old is said reed? Is it reasonable to assume it has died from natural causes?
If you concentrate on the sound you're making you should hear when the reed has lost its clarity, and also it will feel softer/different.

What news?
Problem solved?
 

Pee Dee

Member
Messages
425
Location
Dorset
I'm sure this is a familiar question from a new saxophone player - still need to know the answer though! How can you tell when a reed needs replacing? I was diligently practising my scales this evening when I suddenly couldn't get a note at all. Fairly positive it wasn't me. I took the reed off and put it back on and resumed - although it sounded quite wooly.

Liz
Hi Liz
Had you been playing long before you started you scales, could it be tiredness? I know when I need a rest, the lip loses its strength and some notes wont come, usually starts with high C#.
Or is it happening even after a rest.
I know what the problem is, you have a problem:w00t:
Somebody'll sort you out:welldone
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
22,004
Location
Just north of Munich
Could be the reed getting too wet - or tired. Let this dry out and see if it recovers. Also get a few more reeds and have more in playable condition.
 

Altolady

Member
Messages
59
Location
sunny, hot, North-West England
I play mine until they chip too, but I always have 3 blown in and rotate them.

I struggled for a time a couple of months back, so my teacher suggested I start using 2.5 reed instead of a 2 (Vandoren Java), sorted the problem for me.

Hope you get sorted :)
 
OP
L

Liz

New Member
Messages
9
Location
London
Not sure what the problem but it seems to have sorted itself out. Perhaps it was me after all....
 

CaillouSax

Member
Messages
62
Location
Gatineau (Québec), Canada
When the sound begin to be not enough good for me, or I can't do higher or lower notes (after having trying a few times), or there is a chip or something else... I change my reed. I have 4 in rotation.
 

MartinL

Member
Messages
378
Location
Bilston, United Kingdom.
I was looking for information on reeds yesterday and found this blog. Interesting, if true... What do our experienced members think.

How come your reeds don't last very long? When done playing, take them off the mouthpiece, flex them up a bit at the tip on a cloth to dry them and carefully put them away in a sleeve. Flex them back because your lower lip presses them against the mouthpiece and they tend to warp inward and choke up. Flexing them back helps them dry flat again. After 2 - 3 months playing on a reed, start to wet them in water instead of saliva. Saliva has a residue which seals the pores in the reed but after a while it starts to be a detriment to the wood. You will know the reed is sealed because the tip becomes wrinkled when first wet. Reason, the tip is expanding but the rest of the reed is not because it is not wet enough. Water soaking will expand the rest of the reed and will play well.

I made reeds 30 years ago - many for famous reed players. I am now playing on reeds I made in 1984.



Not my words remember.. :)
 

RedBottom

Member
Messages
191
If I chip or split them, then I dump them. Otherwise, I'll play a reed until it begins to feel 'flat' and lifeless, or if I start squeaking more than usual on the easy stuff.
 

CaillouSax

Member
Messages
62
Location
Gatineau (Québec), Canada
I was looking for information on reeds yesterday and found this blog. Interesting, if true... What do our experienced members think.

How come your reeds don't last very long? When done playing, take them off the mouthpiece, flex them up a bit at the tip on a cloth to dry them and carefully put them away in a sleeve. Flex them back because your lower lip presses them against the mouthpiece and they tend to warp inward and choke up. Flexing them back helps them dry flat again. After 2 - 3 months playing on a reed, start to wet them in water instead of saliva. Saliva has a residue which seals the pores in the reed but after a while it starts to be a detriment to the wood. You will know the reed is sealed because the tip becomes wrinkled when first wet. Reason, the tip is expanding but the rest of the reed is not because it is not wet enough. Water soaking will expand the rest of the reed and will play well.

I made reeds 30 years ago - many for famous reed players. I am now playing on reeds I made in 1984.



Not my words remember.. :)
I am looking for the meaning of "flex up" and "flex back". In any case, it's worth a try... when I will fully understand the process! :)))
 
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