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BOTM September 2019 - Someone To Watch Over Me

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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This month's Ballad is "Someone To Watch Over Me", written by George and Ira Gershwin in 1926.

The notes and backing track are here:
Someone To Watch Over Me

The notes and backing are in Concert C (D for tenor sax, A for Alto). The backing is at 80bpm, with a 4-bar intro and then the whole song played twice. I have also included a slower backing at 65bpm.
(The .sib file is for the notes in Sibelius format, and the .MGU file is for Band In A Box)

Have fun!

Here's Ella:

and here's Stanley Turrentine's version:

and Aubra Graves (takes a while to start):
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-Fepks5NII
 
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rhysonsax

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Great choice. Here's a lovely recording by "the father of the tenor saxophone":

And this by Ben Webster:

And Gene Ammons:

It certainly works beautifully on tenor sax.

Rhys
 
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OP
nigeld

nigeld

I don't need another mouthpiece; but . . .
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Location
Bristol, UK
Ok, I'll bite. Quick and dirty (don't we all use this disclaimer?)
60 bpm, wow at this tempo a minute feels infinitely long!
Wow - that was quick! But not at all dirty - well done. :clapping:

60bpm does indeed feel very slow, that's why I made my backing track faster.
 

randulo

23 months since I began - 3.7% of my adult life
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On the alto, Eb concert is makes me play that low C for better or worse. Going from the octave C to the low C is a challenge. That was the hardest part. I wasn't crazy about playing it in concert C, it felt too high. I think I might try a slightly higher key, too so I get a little practice on the high register, too.
 

randulo

23 months since I began - 3.7% of my adult life
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Sonny Rollins, tenor saxophone, Clifton Anderson, trombone; Bob Cranshaw, bass; Steve Jordan, drums.
Sonny Rollins will go down in history as not only the single most enduring tenor saxophonist of the bebop and hard bop era, but also as one of the greatest contemporary jazz saxophonists of them all."

If you're interested in this tune, search for all the Sonny versions of it, he went through some different versions.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tc_B1lliu8A
 

rhysonsax

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Can't stand Sonny Rollins. His sounds so dry. Makes my teeth itch. :confused:
Sonny's sound went through a lot of changes over the years. For me, there is no greater tenor saxophone sound than his in the late 1950s, although Dexter came close. Surely your teeth like his sound on albums such as "Saxophone Colossus", "Live at the Village Vanguard" and "Way Out West".

His sound changed a lot in the 1960s, but is still great to my ears (and teeth).

Rhys
 

randulo

23 months since I began - 3.7% of my adult life
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Everything about Sonny is personal, his sound, his rhythm, melodic concept and humor. He may be the greatest tenor player ever. Plus, didn't murder Summertime.
 

jbtsax

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A few years back my friend Hakukani on SOTW turned me on to a trombone/low brass player by the name of Slyde Hyde with whom he had the opportunity to play some gigs with in Hawaii when he was still living there. He also introduced me to the album "Late Night Jazz" that Slyde made with tenor player Pete Christlieb that quickly became one of my all time favorites. Most of the album features Slyde on trombone and euphonium, but Pete is featured on "Someone to Watch Over Me". I hope folks at the cafe enjoy his version as much as I do.

 

jbtsax

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Another great player that I've never heard of. Thank you for sharing. :thumb:
When I was in my early teens I would stay up late and watch the Johnny Carson show just to hear Doc Severinson and his big band. Everytime they came back from a commercial break they would often be into this great tenor solo that Johnny would cut off in the middle---something I never forgave him for. It was years later that I found out the great tenor soloist in Doc's band was a young Pete Christlieb, and I have followed him ever since. He is probably the best tenor player not many people have ever heard of.
 
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