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bevelled tone holes

jbtsax

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Good answer :thumb:

It is possible that the Martin's soldered on toneholes rather than "extruded" (pulled out from the body) had to be thicker in order to have enough surface to get a good soldered contact with the body. This thicker ring if left as is would produce a tonehole with a rim far too wide to be practical for seating pads---hence they were beveled at the top to make the rim a more acceptable thickness. I don't know this for sure, but it is my story and I'm sticking to it until somebody comes up with a better explanation. ;}
 

dubrosa22

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Thanks a good explanation for the Martins but doesn't hold true for drawn tone holes with rolled/beveled tone holes like the ones found on Conn, SML and many other sax makers.

The PROS are they seal well (when level) and they look nice :)

The CONS are they stick more to pads, they don't seal well (if not level) and are very difficult to repair or level.

I think the added expense and skill of making RTHs means they stood for a premium product if not in reality then at least for the marketing dept.


Sent from my Xperia
 

thomsax

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3,807
Good answer :thumb:

It is possible that the Martin's soldered on toneholes rather than "extruded" (pulled out from the body) had to be thicker in order to have enough surface to get a good soldered contact with the body. This thicker ring if left as is would produce a tonehole with a rim far too wide to be practical for seating pads---hence they were beveled at the top to make the rim a more acceptable thickness. I don't know this for sure, but it is my story and I'm sticking to it until somebody comes up with a better explanation. ;}
Another good answer. Martin's (and maybe Courtier's as well) toneholes were softsoldered to the body/bell. King and Holton were brazed. So Martin used lower temp for soldering thier toneholes. Martin's tonholes also have a diffent angle to the body/bell which gives these horns the typical Martin sound. Bore, taper is also important for the tone/timbre. It's interesting that Martin didn't use the bevelded toneholes on thier Committee models. But they kept the bevelded tonneholes on The India, The Martin Medalist and The Martin Imperial that were made in the late 50's, 60's and early 70's. Why?

The machine that did the machine drawn tonholes "Extruded" were expensive so it was just Conn and Buescher that could afford these machines. The had to made and sell lots of saxes to get to "breakeven". I doubt that all Conn's had extruded toneholes? On my Beuscher C soprano (they did c 500 ) the toneholes are brazed. I think Martin kept the soft soldered on toneholes because they wer important to the tone/sound and also gave the company an image like "soldered on toneholes - like the finest flutes .... ". Martin garanted thier toneholes for 50 years!
 

jbtsax

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Techs who have had to resolder these Martin toneholes that have developed leaks could call them "bedeviled toneholes". >:)
 
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