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M/Pieces - Ligs Berg Larsen mouthpiece identification

peteretep

New Member
Messages
2
Hello everyone, first post here.
A friend recently gave me an old mouthpiece she had lying around and I'm trying to identify what it is.
On the top side it says "Berg Larson Reg Design 851427/8". On the other side it says 80.
I can't see any 80 tenor mouthpieces on the Berg Larsen site.
I'm a relatively new player, and I play a Yamaha mouthpiece at the moment. I like playing this one, but it's not quite the sound I'm after - too loud and brash. I'd like to figure out what it is, so I can use it as a bench mark when looking for other mouthpieces.
Thanks!
Peter

 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
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669
I think thats a vintage "Boat table Berg" which is worth a pretty penny.

Im not a vintage expert on bergs but I think that is what it is.

If Im right thats a 300 dollar plus "old laying around mpc".

If she is giving more away Im willing.
 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,956
On the shank it should say something like "95/2" and "SMS". Is that where the figure "80" appears and what else is marked there ?

The Berg Larsen site explains what those markings mean Berg Larsen | How to Choose As you say, there tenors start at 90 ( 0.090" tip opening) but I believe they used to make specials of different sizes.

It looks like a nice old Berg Larsen from the 50s, but could be as early as 40s and as late as the 60s.

More historical information on Berg larsen models etc. here: Berg Larsen Mouthpieces | Theo Wanne

Rhys
 

David Roach

Senior Member
Subscriber
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628
I have one of these too. I got it with a gift of a Martin tenor from a friend whose Dad led dance bands in the 40s and 50s. It's a real goer!
Mine only has the number 90 on the shank, no 'over' number, no SMS or M. I'm not a mouthpiece historian, but I guess maybe earlier Bergs had no indications apart from the tip opening? Experts please chime in. It has what I understand to be a 'bullet' chamber - a long flat baffle with a bullet-shaped descent into the throat.
It had not been well cared for and was filthy with many years of crud (same with the Martin) so I had it refaced to a 7 tip (.100") by Ed Pillinger, perhaps a rash decision if it was worth a lot, but blimey does it play!

Incidentally, my friend's dad played it with # 1 and 1.5 Rico and Vandoren reeds, if the contents of the case are indicative. I could blow that standing on the other side of the room! :rofl:
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
669
Since you dont like the piece and its from a friend you might want to inform your friend that her throw away mouthpiece is quite valuable. But if she doesnt care then hold on to it. There may come a time where you find it easier to control and you may learn to appreciate it. A berg isnt the best piece for most beginners but they do have something special going on when you are more experienced. Who knows, maybe you will always hate it but maybe not.
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
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5,902
I have a 50s? Berg baritone mouthpiece with the letters '95 T 3 M' on it. It's a nice easy blow but not raucous enough for my usual baritone outings or quite smooth enough for classical. As far as I know, it came from a big band player and was partnered with a 1937 Conn.
 
OP
peteretep

peteretep

New Member
Messages
2
Thanks for all the responses! Didn't realise it could be worth that much - but she also had a very nice otto link in the same bag that someone else took.
It just says 80, and yes, it's also a real goer. Definitely don't hate it, just trying to decide if I like it enough to start working up to it.

This was also in the bag, and I'm not sure what it is - very odd looking piece with kind of a bum shape on the tip. I think it's for an alto.


 

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,956
ROC Britone made in England possibly in the 50s or so.

Ten or more years ago they used to be very cheap but some people ask quite a bit of money for them.

Although they look a bit like the “Made in England” Brilhart Tonalin pieces on the outside that strange baffle means they sound a lot brighter. Presumably that explains the model name.

Rhys
 

Phil

Member
Commercial Café Supporter
Messages
669
I had a tenor version once. I thought it sounded like a piece of trash..
It belongs in a history archive of how not to design a mouthpiece.
Of all the pretty bad designs ever made it is at least an interesting one!
 
Last edited:

rhysonsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,956
I have a 50s? Berg baritone mouthpiece with the letters '95 T 3 M' on it. It's a nice easy blow but not raucous enough for my usual baritone outings or quite smooth enough for classical. As far as I know, it came from a big band player and was partnered with a 1937 Conn.
@Nick Wyver Doesn't that "T" marking indicate that the baritone mouthpiece was designed to be played with Tenor reeds ? If so, it would be cheaper for reeds but would probably sound a bit "lightweight".

Rhys
 

Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
5,902
@Nick Wyver Doesn't that "T" marking indicate that the baritone mouthpiece was designed to be played with Tenor reeds ? If so, it would be cheaper for reeds but would probably sound a bit "lightweight".

Rhys
Does it? I've no idea. The window is the same length as my PPT but the width of the window at the tip is 1mm narrower. So there's really not a lot in it. I'll give it a try with tenor reeds sometime and see what happens. Having just forked out £37 for 5 reeds, using tenor reeds instead would be a bit of a saving (If I actually used that mouthpiece much, that is).
 

DonOtto

New Member
Messages
4
On the shank it should say something like "95/2" and "SMS". Is that where the figure "80" appears and what else is marked there ?

The Berg Larsen site explains what those markings mean Berg Larsen | How to Choose As you say, there tenors start at 90 ( 0.090" tip opening) but I believe they used to make specials of different sizes.

It looks like a nice old Berg Larsen from the 50s, but could be as early as 40s and as late as the 60s.

More historical information on Berg larsen models etc. here: Berg Larsen Mouthpieces | Theo Wanne

Rhys
I have a couple of these old Berg HR tenor pieces. They can play amazingly well. The first only had a number for the tip opening, On the other side of the shank it says Berg Larsen written slanted. They are from late forties and probably finished by Mr. Larsen himself. Most were made with small tips, 80 to maybe 90, but no need to get them opened. I have for more than three years played a slant marked 85 but measuring 80, and I can outplay any Link, Dukoff or Guardala.
 
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