Classical Barber's Adagio - Amstel Quartet

Yes, that's really lovely.

Rhys
 
The Aurelia Quartet's version has been on this thread before on the Cafe but I prefer this one.



I love my Sax, but I love music more.
Originally written for string Quartet, but later arr for full orchestra.
Perhaps a jazz version would suit the Sax more. Alla .... Gil Evans.
 
Thank you for sharing that beautiful piece performed so musically with such control and grace. You made my day for introducing me to that wonderful quartet.
 
Thank you for sharing that beautiful piece performed so musically with such control and grace. You made my day for introducing me to that wonderful quartet.
Have a look at this. I wonder how they stay in time given how slowly sound travels - a wonderful idea to slowly walk through the people to finally meet and play together. I wish I lived and played sax in Holland - there seems to be such a respect and appreciation of both jazz and classical music there.

 
I wish I lived and played sax in Holland - there seems to be such a respect and appreciation of both jazz and classical music there...
Only if you're any good
 
If this were attempted in the U.S. I'm afraid you wouldn't be able to hear the music for the talking and people coming and going. The piece they were performing seemed to be like a free form cannon where vertical rhythmic accuracy was not required.

You are correct about the speed of sound affecting the precision with which ensembles play when they are spread out for long distances. That is why in marching bands and drum and bugle corps performing on a football field, the players must not try to play with what they hear but only with the conductor's/drum major's beat.
 
I often think - "why do I bother coming to the Sax Caff ?" but then I drop in on threads like this - Wow! Beautiful. Thank you.

Better think of something profound to say now...err...umm...jbtsax...?...anyone...?
 
Better think of something profound to say now...err...umm...jbtsax...?...anyone...?

Sorry Mack didn't mean to hi- jack your post, with the Jazz suggestion, but Gil Evans did a great job of Concerto De Aranjuez.
Take a look at this video on YouTube:
Ipad won't past the link
 
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Profound? - How about some Zen before ten - It's time to get out of the woodshed, get into the kitchen, crack a Bardolino, feed the dogs, empty the dishwasher, clean up yesterday's dirty plates, peal the potatoes, prepare the veggies and sliced beef, rustle up a horse radish sauce with a splash of Pinot Grigot from the Friaul, all the while listening to some great recommendations from the Tube, eat, enjoy, hit the couch and catch some Zzzzs. Not very Zen. Not really profound. But that's life.
P.S. @Jamesmac - Miles Davis Concerto de Aranjuez. Got it on Vinyl - must dig it out.
Have a nice evening - gruss - spike
 
Better think of something profound to say now...err...umm...jbtsax...?...anyone...?
Hmmm. . . . I often think "I'd better get on Cafe Sax right away, I might be missing something really cool". :) Is that profound enough?
 
Sorry Mack didn't mean to hi- jack your post, with the Jazz suggestion, but Gil Evans did a great job of Concerto De Aranjuez.
Take a look at this video on YouTube:
We shall just have to agree to disagree about the suitability of the saxophone in playing classical music. I think to pigeonhole it as a an instrument only suited to playing jazz and pop music shortchanges the wonderful versatility and range of expression that is possible from this amazing invention. Not only is there a wealth of classical music written specifically for the saxophone nowadays, there are many excellent transcriptions that fit the instrument as well.

One of the first recital pieces I played as a university student was the 1st movement of the Bach A Minor Violin Concerto. Just because my chosen instrument was invented much later than the others shouldn't deny me the opportunity to express myself through all of the wonderful literature that came before.
 
Speaking of which, or something vaguely similar - this guy's no slouch.

 
We shall just have to agree to disagree about the suitability of the saxophone in playing classical music. I think to pigeonhole it as a an instrument only suited to playing jazz and pop music shortchanges the wonderful versatility and range of expression that is possible from this amazing invention. Not only is there a wealth of classical music written specifically for the saxophone nowadays, there are many excellent transcriptions that fit the instrument as well.

One of the first recital pieces I played as a university student was the 1st movement of the Bach A Minor Violin Concerto. Just because my chosen instrument was invented much later than the others shouldn't deny me the opportunity to express myself through all of the wonderful literature that came before.[/me

Sorry ipad
 
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