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kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Hi doodes and doodettes

I started clarinet and alto sax in my early teens when Eric Dolphy was still alive and the world was yet young. I did a bit of tenor in my early twenties. I was crap but had fun, did a lot of blowing in deserted mine buildings, old generator huts and abandoned houses - anywhere with a roof where we could get to lumbered with instruments and bottles and make noise without being interrupted by irate householders or the fuzz...

Later I extended my lifestyle from boatbuilding to being a marine surveyor/boat bum and music became restricted to tin whistle - not too painful to throw away when they corrode. My other instruments went in store. A decade ago I married and we have a son rising eight who threatens to be a drummer. Thinking I might encourage him to be a musician instead I got a Chinese cheapie Tenor sax (amazing quality for peanuts IMHO - if you haven't tried it don't knock it) and am getting my lip back in.

Deciding to design myself a refresher course and get some ideas for our son's musical education I've been scrabbling around on the net. Amazing! If it had only been around all those decades ago - who knows? If I could have got over my antipathy to cities...
 

trimmy

One day i will...
Messages
10,273
Welcome back to the sax kernewegor :D where did the username come from :confused:
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Nice intro you're our type of guy.
Musical tastes?
Welcome Kernewegor

Andy
Thanks Andy. Musical taste: jazz generally, particularly bebop and post bebop, but all eras have their interests, for instance I am just reading (again) 'We called it music' by Eddie Condon, the forword of which is dedicated to the deceased Bix with a comment to the effect that 'I hope he isn't wearing one of those caps.'

Also blues, some big band, sometimes; Celtic music, especially uilleainn pipes; Mozart, Bach, who both swing like mad; folk music from anywhere in the world other that the 'finger in one ear and sing through your nose variety; didgeridoo (google, watch, listen and amaze yourself!) Indian music; brass bands (Cornish, innit?) - which isn't all beer and bare bums out of coach windows after the Championship (although both have been known) but there are some seriously good musicians out there...
 

Linky Lee

Member
Messages
180
Welcome Kernewegor!

I'm just coming back to the sax myself, good decision!
Drums are great for improving your rhythm and co-ordination but also very loud, I had to sell mine in the end and I miss them dearly! Highly recommend a piano or at least a half decent keyboard, incredibly useful even if you don't want to play it properly. Other than that I'd say get him listening to music and take him to some live shows and see what he enjoys!
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
I agree, Linky Lee, a keyboard is on the shopping list - what better way to learn about and get a real feel for chords? My wife teaches brass (she did a degree on tenor horn) and her brother teaches keyboard (and is also a very good trumpeter) and I have years of experience of being crap so we are all there for him.

Being rising eight he has, like Breandán O hEithir's definition of a begrudger in his 'Begrudger's Guide to Irish Politics' " a brain which combines the mind of a butterfly with the memory of an elephant " - so getting him away from the computer and his Lego long enough to study takes guile and deep cunning.

He's shown he can get a noise out of assorted brass and reed instruments and didgeridoo so it's likely that he end up playing some sort of horn. Oboe and jazz drums would be an interesting double... (!?!)
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Thanks for the welcome Gary and Navarro.

"...blues and the abstract truth of the sax"... that has a nice Zen ring to it.
 

Mike

Senior Member
Messages
559
Hi doodes and doodettes

I started clarinet and alto sax in my early teens when Eric Dolphy was still alive and the world was yet young. I did a bit of tenor in my early twenties. I was crap but had fun, did a lot of blowing in deserted mine buildings, old generator huts and abandoned houses - anywhere with a roof where we could get to lumbered with instruments and bottles and make noise without being interrupted by irate householders or the fuzz...

Later I extended my lifestyle from boatbuilding to being a marine surveyor/boat bum and music became restricted to tin whistle - not too painful to throw away when they corrode. My other instruments went in store. A decade ago I married and we have a son rising eight who threatens to be a drummer. Thinking I might encourage him to be a musician instead I got a Chinese cheapie Tenor sax (amazing quality for peanuts IMHO - if you haven't tried it don't knock it) and am getting my lip back in.

Deciding to design myself a refresher course and get some ideas for our son's musical education I've been scrabbling around on the net. Amazing! If it had only been around all those decades ago - who knows? If I could have got over my antipathy to cities...
The fuzz? You are old...lol........
American? Excuse my cultural deficiency if not American... Like myself, and pushing 58, yes the fuzz was the term used....Also The 'Man' when we had to abruptly swallow and digest a few joints and have our car dismantled, because in those days we got carted off to jail. I always found it amazing they never once checked our teeth! We didn't have time to floss! lol....So much for forensic investigation!

I have a cheap Chinese horn (Simba) and I'm fine with it.... It's been good to me. I always recommend them! Although mine doesn't have the best action. Too high, but we adjust.
Cost me $300 new!

Good luck getting back into it!
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Hi Mike (belatedly!)

I have notifications switched off so didn't see your posting - sorry.

Yeah, fuzz, rozzers, busies, plods, the filth, cops, coppers, the bill, the old bill, flatfeet... and for the Ministry of Defence Police - the modplods! Few other professions have attracted as many nicknames - I shan't bore you with the Cornish, Welsh and Irish language ones...

No, not American, though I could almost have been if my dad, having been demobbed by a grateful government at the end of hostilities in 1945 and was consequently trying to make ends meet hadn't been turned down by Canadian immigration because he had had polio as a kid and suffered from chronic bronchitis.

No, I'm a Cornish Irish Scots hybrid living in Cornwall - God's own country, and I say that as a devout athiest - and when it's not raining and you can escape the tourists no finer place to be figuring out how to pay your mortgage.

We have a strong musical tradition - it's brass band and male voice choir country, bit like Wales without the mountains. With only one city professional opportunities are limited unless you are prepared to jaunt up into England - so it's mainly pub venues.

What is the suit saying to the busker in your avatar? I can't raise the definition to make out the words and its been bugging me for ages!
 
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