Tutorials

Audio interface

Tommy Ng

Member
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583
Location
South Yorkshire
Hi

Is a mixer considered to be an audio interface (with PC)? I am looking for an audio interface for recording preferably with reverb function. Any suggestion?
 

Howard Long

Member
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51
Location
London
I use a Behringer 1622FX which comes with a USB audio interface. It's a bit of a cheat, in that the package itself is a straight analogue mixer with a built in multi-effects processor, plus a bundled external separate simple low latency ASIO stereo USB sound dongle. Thus, there's no proper multichannel PC based real time mixing. However it does have plenty of knobs, sliders and switches to keep you happy twiddling for quite some time. There are similar units with fewer channels, but caveat emptor about that USB interface, although for your purposes it may fit the bill (as it did mine), and I consider it excellent value for money.

Cheers, Howard
 

Taz

Busking Oracle
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3,623
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Rugby UK
Tommy, I think there may be a downside to having reverb on your mixer. The reason is you would be recording the sax with the reverb on. This means that you would not be able to edit the sound afterwards (ie remove the reverb).

Like taking a colour digital photo. You can alter it to black and white using your pc. If you take the picture in black and white, your pc can't make it colour.

When you record your sax, do so "dry" in other words with no effects. These can then be added after, to colour the sound (now I'm confusing myself...must have a lay down)
 

Moz

Senior Member
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841
Location
North of Liskeard, Cornwall
Tommy, I think there may be a downside to having reverb on your mixer. The reason is you would be recording the sax with the reverb on. This means that you would not be able to edit the sound afterwards (ie remove the reverb).

Like taking a colour digital photo. You can alter it to black and white using your pc. If you take the picture in black and white, your pc can't make it colour.

When you record your sax, do so "dry" in other words with no effects. These can then be added after, to colour the sound (now I'm confusing myself...must have a lay down)
Taz is right. Always record dry and keep reverb for live performances.

The Zoom H2 has an admirable usb audio interface (as well as being an excellent on-the-fly recorder plus other stuff). No need to power it up, just plug the usb cable in, choose from the two menu choices that come up (audio interface or storage) and go.

Works.

Martin
 
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Tommy Ng

Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
583
Location
South Yorkshire
Many thanks for the advice.

I am just using a camcorder to record video and sound at the moment. Somehow the recorded sound sounds much different from the sound i hear in the hall.
 

Howard Long

Member
Messages
51
Location
London
I may be misunderstanding this, but are you looking to dub a separately recorded audio track onto your video? I had a devil of a time doing this a few months ago on some drumming I'd recorded in this way for exactly the same reason, the sound from the camcorder mic wasn't very good. When I imported the video it was slightly faster (or slower, can't quite remember), so I had to run the audio through GoldWave a few times to get it spot on during dubbing.

Howard
 

Howard Long

Member
Messages
51
Location
London
Tommy

Are you expecting to be able to hear the sound that you are recording in real time in headphones, and if so, do you expect that live monitor playback be with or without the reverb?

FWIW I sometimes use the reverb effect in real time because it covers a multitude of sins, making me sound much better than I really am ;-) a bit like this, although I must say this guy sounds a gazillion times better than me with or without the effects he's running.

Howard
 
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Tommy Ng

Tommy Ng

Member
Messages
583
Location
South Yorkshire
Some audio interfaces do come with a headphone output. What i wish to do is to play the backing track via the audio interface as well, wonder if it is possible.
 
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