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approximate any line by its ups and downs

seerskater

New Member
Messages
3
tell me what you guys think about this approach

listen to a line, and instead of caring about the exact notes, just care about the intervals of up and down within the line. for instance, if you heard someone play a ^ c ^ e ^ g , f#, you could approximate it with any combination of (note) up (note) up (note) up (note) down and between the third note and fourth note (note).

i find it helpful to use this approach to imbed players' ideas in my arsenal when im too lazy to actually get the actual notes :/

but also it can be helpful in a jam session when you want to respond to someones idea but dont know the notes they played. does anyone else use this approach?
 

Wade Cornell

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
2,124
tell me what you guys think about this approach

listen to a line, and instead of caring about the exact notes, just care about the intervals of up and down within the line. for instance, if you heard someone play a ^ c ^ e ^ g , f#, you could approximate it with any combination of (note) up (note) up (note) up (note) down and between the third note and fourth note (note).

i find it helpful to use this approach to imbed players' ideas in my arsenal when im too lazy to actually get the actual notes :/

but also it can be helpful in a jam session when you want to respond to someones idea but dont know the notes they played. does anyone else use this approach?
I hope you're not a commercial airline pilot making approaches this way.

Hear a line, play a line. Make your playing intentional whether copying what you’ve heard, playing a countermelody, or counterpoint. Not knowing the notes you are about to play and making this a method of playing is not (in my opinion) a way to advance as a musician.
 

Colin the Bear

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,064
Call and answer? If you're responding to something that's just been played and you miss a note then it's up to you to find another way that works. Sometimes I just blow and then try to resolve what I hear. My fingers more often than not know better than my head. A chromatic run can get you out of trouble.

To answer a c e g f# I would want to play e g b d c depending on the key of course. It's all very subjective.
 

seerskater

New Member
Messages
3
lol yeah chromatic runs are like the bandaids of failed harmony. most of the time i only think in terms of chromaticism when im doing this approach. occasionally there will be a triad or two or maybe a 7th. i feel like this "topic" had a confusing first post
 

old git

Tremendous Bore
Messages
5,545
That was how the first notation systems worked, according to Howard Goodall anyway.
 
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